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Kiama Council Initiates Survey to Shape Growth and Housing Strategy
Kiama Council Initiates Survey to Shape Growth and Housing Strategy

16 April 2024, 5:29 AM

Kiama Council has launched a comprehensive online engagement portal and survey to further involve the community in shaping its Growth and Housing Strategy. This initiative marks a crucial phase in the council's recent commitment to collaborative planning.Director of Planning, Environment, and Community, Jessica Rippon, emphasised the significance of community participation in this process. "We urge all members of the community to actively engage in this important dialogue," she stated. "Your input will help us plan for future growth while preserving the unique character of our Municipality."The survey, accessible at kiama-growth.mysocialpinpoint.com.au, covers various aspects of growth and future opportunities and takes approximately 15 minutes to complete. Paper copies are also available at the Council's Administration Building, Kiama Library, and Gerringong Library.In an effort to engage younger residents, interactive growth and housing displays will be featured at local libraries during the school holidays, inviting children to envision the community's future.Council's engagement efforts have already seen diverse participation from various segments of the community through pop-up events, farmers' markets stalls, stakeholder discussions, and meetings. Feedback from these activities, along with survey responses, will inform a comprehensive report on the engagement process in the coming weeks.Industry stakeholders also had an opportunity to contribute during the recent Industry Forum, which attracted over 60 representatives from the housing industry. Discussions focused on growth, the planning system in NSW, infrastructure, employment lands, housing, and development assessment.Director Rippon highlighted the positive and collaborative atmosphere of the forum, emphasising its role in fostering constructive dialogue among stakeholders.Looking ahead, Council remains committed to providing further opportunities for diverse community input as it continues to develop its Growth and Housing Strategy. Residents are encouraged to visit www.kiama.nsw.gov.au/growth for updates and information.The engagement period will run until May 31, 2024, ensuring ample time for community members to share their perspectives and help shape the future of Kiama.

The Bugle welcomes Trish Griffin
The Bugle welcomes Trish Griffin

15 April 2024, 1:30 AM

Kiama is blessed with a multitude of accomplished authors. Among the list, Trish Griffin, a two time non fiction published author with two more books on the way, finds inspiration writing the stories of people she meets on her travels. She grew up on a large cattle station 180 kilometres north west of Longreach in the fifties. Reminiscing on days spent barefoot, riding horses 24/7, and mastering the art of driving at a young age. "I had my own gun since I was 8 years old, we all did," she shares, on the unique realities of her upbringing. The freedom and tranquillity of her childhood inspired her to explore the world.Her second published book, “Dancing on the Head of a Pin”, was met with rave reviews. It chronicles her journey along the Camino from Barcelona to Santiago, covering a staggering 1300 kilometres in 2012. Her writing only flows when she's deeply inspired, and the individuals she encounters during her journeys serve as the perfect muse.I had the privilege of discussing Trish's current work in progress, a book focusing on post-war immigration in the Snowy Mountains region. She spent time there with locals and again inspiration hit when listening to their stories. Trish is committed to presenting these narratives without any agenda or political bias, allowing the truth to shine through organically. Keep an eye out for updates on her upcoming book release on the Bugle app.Trish gave her advice for those who want to travel in the same way she does, getting involved in the community and immersing herself in the culture. She discourages organised tours like Contiki and volunteer organisations, preferring instead to engage in independent volunteering to truly experience local culture firsthand and witness the direct impact of her efforts. Despite acknowledging the discomfort and fears associated with solo travel, she believes the rewards are boundless, stating, "It's a scary edge, but that's where all the good stuff happens - you learn things you don't learn in school."Trish's approach to travel involves landing in a new place, taking a taxi or bus to find budget accommodations, and relying on locals for insider tips on navigating the area. She describes this style of travel as being "on the edge," where one can gain invaluable experiences and insights that go beyond typical tourist experiences.Trish brings a wealth of incredible stories from her global adventures, and we're delighted to welcome her as a new columnist. Look out for her name on the byline, and stay tuned to Bugle News for updates on her upcoming releases.

Honouring Charmian Clift: A Literary Legacy
Honouring Charmian Clift: A Literary Legacy

14 April 2024, 10:56 PM

In a heartfelt tribute to one of Australia's most revered writers, Charmian Clift, Kiama unveiled a blue plaque at the Kiama Library on Saturday 13 April. Attended by dignitaries, relatives and local historians the event was opened by Mayor Neil Reilly with a welcome to country by Councillor Stuart Larkins. This commemoration stands as a testament to Clift's enduring impact on literature and culture, a legacy cherished by generations.Born in Kiama in 1923, Charmian Clift's journey into the world of words began at a tender age, her pen weaving tales of her beloved hometown's wonders, such as the famous blowhole, even as a child. Her passion for writing flourished, leading her to Sydney where she ventured into journalism, eventually joining the Australian Women’s Army Service during World War II.Dr Sarah Kaine MLC with Dr Graham Tucker in KiamaClift's life took a significant turn when she met George Johnston, a renowned war correspondent, sparking a passionate yet tumultuous love affair. Despite the challenges they faced, their journey together led them to Greece, where the idyllic landscapes of Kalymnos and Hydra became the backdrop for Clift's literary masterpieces. Works like "Mermaid Singing" and "Peel Me a Lotus" echoed her experiences in Greece, captivating readers with their autobiographical essence.In 1960, Clift penned her solo novel, "Walk to the Paradise Gardens," drawing inspiration from her roots in Kiama. Her subsequent works, including "Honour’s Mimic" and the recently published "The End of the Morning," reflected her profound reflections on life, love, and society.Sue Eggins, President of the Kiama District Historical Society was the principal proponent of the submission and all the follow up required to achieve this great milestone. Her enthusiasm, effort and persistence ensured the plaque stood as a testament to Charmian's legacy. Her work is greatly appreciated by the historical society and the Kiama community.

Community Grant Program 2024
Community Grant Program 2024

13 April 2024, 11:00 PM

The Community Bank Oak Flats and Gerringong are holding their annual Community Grants Program with up to $150,000 in grants to be awarded. Applications open Monday 15th April and close on Monday 3rd of June 2024.This year the Community Bank is looking to invest in new and existing opportunities within the local community. With up to $150,000 to be awarded, any local clubs, groups, organisations, charities or not-for-profits could benefit greatly from a Community Grant.Applications close on Monday the 3rd of June 2024 and must be submitted via the online form. Head over to the Community Bank Oak Flats and Gerringong Facebook or Instagram page to find the link.The Community Bank officially opened its doors to the general public in 2000 and has since reinvested over $4.5 million in the local community. From skateparks and mental health workshops to hospital wings, and local sporting clubs, the Community Bank has helped improve and support the community wherever possible.To celebrate its 21st birthday last year, the Community Bank donated 40 Heart of the Nation defibrillators to local businesses, organisations, not-for-profits and groups. Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes in Australia today and the state of the art technology can be the difference between life and death. The Community Bank recognised how crucial it is to have AED devices available to the wider community and offered a helping hand to those who need it most.Geoff Egan, Chairman of Oak Flats Financial Services Limited said “Every day our customers help change lives, and save lives, simply by banking with us.” The Community Bank reinvests 80% of profits back to the local community, so when you bank with the Community Bank Oak Flats and Gerringong, you know your money is making a difference.About the Bendigo Bank’s Community Bank model: Since 1998, the Bendigo Community Bank network has now grown to include more than 300 branches Australia-wide. Our Community Banks are wholly owned by their local communities, employing almost 1,600 people and overseen by more than 1,950 directors. Our purpose is to feed into the prosperity of our customers and communities - not off them. To date, more than $251 million has been returned to strengthen and underpin the local communities in which they support.

Family life in Early Gerringong
Family life in Early Gerringong

13 April 2024, 11:00 PM

My mother, Elva Emery, who passed away in 1997, was asked to do a talk for Gerringong’s 140th anniversary on what life was like for families in the early days of Gerringong. If our records are correct, she gave the talk in 1994. My mother was born in 1923 and so remembered the Great Depression of the 1930s with great clarity. Elva Emery on her wedding day in 1947Gerringong may now be associated with expensive real estate, but life back in the early years was not easy by today’s luxurious standards.Here is an edited copy of her speech. By Elva EmeryEarly settlers lived in what we would consider small houses, built from logs or slabs of the local timber. These homes usually had two buildings, for the kitchen stood apart from the bedrooms because of the danger of fire. The main feature of the old kitchens was a large, open fire, sometimes large enough to seat several people round the inside ledges, or benches, which was great on a winter’s night. These fires were fed by large chunks of wood, which sent, when a new log was added, a huge blaze roaring up the chimney, together with dangerous sparks. On and around this open fire there were black, heavy iron kettles, always boiling and ready to make tea, a camp oven for cooking and bread-making and often a large pot of soup in winter.Of course, there was no water in pipes or taps; it had to be carried from the tank in buckets for there was no sink in the kitchen. But there were lots and lots of flies and other insects. Screens for doors and windows were not heard of. A tablecloth was a luxury and table-tops and benches were scrubbed down with a hard brush and sand-soap, a gritty sort of soap which helped remove the stains and grease. The family drank from enamel or tin mugs, with the same sort of materials used for plates, knives, forks and spoons. They spent most of their family time in the kitchen and just went to the larger building to sleep; there were no such rooms as lounges! There were usually quite a number of children in the family and they often slept, three or four together in one bed, which kept them warm in winter. The houses were open underneath, so the winds whistled up through the floorboards. There were often cracks between the wallboards and often they would be papered over with newspaper, or brown paper. The old-style hair and fibre mattresses were very hard to sleep on; altogether, life was pretty hard.But things improved when there was running water in pipes and taps, and sinks in the kitchen, but it was a great luxury to have a real bathroom, even if we had to carry the hot water to the bath. Later on chip heaters were invented, a sort of drum at the end of the bath, with a pipe through the room, which one filled with water and then lit a little fire underneath – it was a rather slow bath! Fathers shaved in the bathroom using some hot water in a shaving mug, with some soap, to first soften their whiskers. Then, with what was called a cut-throat razor, they would slowly and very carefully scrape off all their whiskers; one slip, and your throat was cut – hence the name. No washing machines then, but Mother had a laundry which usually housed a large, built-in copper, under which, again a fire was lit, for the water had to be boiled to properly cleanse the family’s clothes, sheets, towels, etc. Up-to-date laundries had two tubs, one to rinse the clothes after boiling, and one beside to ‘blue’ the white articles. The clothes were transferred from copper to tubs with a pot-stick, which was hot and heavy work, and each piece of clothing, including sheets and towels, was wrung out by hand, until wringers were later available. The clothes were then placed in a cane basket and carried out to be hung, by ‘dolly’ clothes pegs on long, wire clothes lines, propped up here and there by clothes props when the load started to sink to the ground; no Hills hoists then! Members of a church picnic line up for a group photographNot steam-irons, either. Ironing was done with a heavy ‘flat iron’ which had to be continually reheated on the top of the fuel stove. Many of the items were starched, and so had to be ‘damped down’, rolled up for a time, and it all made for a very slow ironing session.Soon after I started school we were lucky to have electricity extended to the Seven Mile Beach area and we were able to put away our lamps and actually buy a wireless, which you would now call a radio, but it was quite a large piece of furniture, and quite magical to us. But very few people could afford to buy electric stoves, or fridges, and for many years we still cooked with a fuel stove and kept our food reasonably fresh with a Coolgardie Safe, or an ice-chest, which carried a block of ice in the top compartment and melted slowly into a tray underneath. Screen doors were still in the future and we controlled (partly) the many flies either by inserting an L-shaped small funnel (something like a Poppa) or by attaching a small, round box to the ceiling of the kitchen, and pulling it down to reveal a very sticky strip of paper, about three feet long, from which no fly ever flew away. We had had a telephone since I could remember, but more remote places like Foxground, were quite remote until it was extended to there. It was a worrying time when anyone was sick, for the only way of contacting a doctor was on horse-back, or by horse and buggy. Many small operations were done in the home. I recall before I was of school age having five stitches in my leg by a doctor from Kiama as I lay on the kitchen table. Elva’s son Mark Emery comments: They bred them tough in those days, and my mother was a very tough woman. Everybody was. 

 Local teacher finds new passion in Kumon Education
Local teacher finds new passion in Kumon Education

13 April 2024, 4:00 AM

In yet another tale of community dedication, the Illawarra region welcomes a new face to its educational landscape. Last year, Sarah Sharp and her family made the decision to settle down in this locale, bringing with them a wealth of experience in teaching Maths and Science for over two decades.But as life often beckons for change, Sarah found herself at a crossroads, seeking a fresh avenue to channel her passion for education. It was during this time that the transformative power of Kumon Education came into focus. Witnessing firsthand the remarkable progress of her own children through the Kumon method, Sarah felt a calling to become a part of this renowned educational initiative.Celebrating its 40th anniversary in Australia this year, Kumon traces its origins back to Japan, where a father's dedication to his son's mathematical development laid the foundation for a global educational phenomenon.  Last August, Sarah and her team proudly opened the doors to the Albion Park Kumon Centre, marking a new chapter in an educational journey. Since then, the centre has become a hub of learning, nurturing young minds and fostering a culture of academic excellence.Reflecting on the strides made by their students, Sarah is very proud. From beaming smiles to tales of newfound confidence, the transformation is palpable. Students eagerly share stories of academic achievements, proudly showcasing awards won at school and revelling in newfound abilities and confidence. They embody the spirit of perseverance and achievement that lies at the heart of the Kumon philosophy.As Kumon continues to witness the blossoming growth of their students, the Albion Park community is enriched by their unwavering dedication to nurturing the next generation of scholars. It provides a great opportunity to avail your children to the transformative power of great education tools to boost and encourage learning.There are some great specials being offered currently – check out their current advertisement.

Political debate starts in Gilmore electorate
Political debate starts in Gilmore electorate

13 April 2024, 2:00 AM

The contentious issue of funding for the proposed Sanctuary Point Library on the south coast remains a focal point of debate, with Liberal candidate for Gilmore, Andrew Constance, questioning the allocation of federal funds for the project.Constance has called upon the federal member and Labor candidate, Fiona Phillips, to clarify the status of the promised $7.5 million grant earmarked for the construction of the library. This grant was initially pledged in 2022, during Phillips' election campaign.Initially proposed in 2018, the Sanctuary Point Library project has faced numerous hurdles, with construction costs estimated at $30 million. Designs for the library were unveiled to the public in 2021, presenting a multifaceted facility featuring community hubs, study areas, conference spaces, and classrooms in addition to traditional library amenities.While the federal government committed $7.5 million towards the project, local government is expected to cover the remaining costs, prompting Shoalhaven Council to request assistance from the New South Wales Government.In response to Constance's queries, Phillips asserted that the federal funding had already been disbursed to Shoalhaven Council as part of the 2022 budget allocation. She emphasized the necessity for the council to fulfill its obligations in ensuring the completion of the Sanctuary Point Library.Constance, however, accused Phillips and the council of failing to progress the project, urging transparency in their dealings with the community regarding the library's development.This dispute comes against the backdrop of a significant increase in construction costs, with the budget ballooning by $11 million. Shoalhaven councillor Paul Ell attributed this rise to the design's larger scale compared to initial expectations.The potential involvement of the New South Wales Government in funding the project has also been raised, with NSW Arts Minister John Graham indicating that the state government is considering the library as a possible recipient of funding through its regular budgetary processes.As the debate rages on, the future of the Sanctuary Point Library remains uncertain, with stakeholders and community members eagerly awaiting resolution on the matter.

Burnetts caring for community
Burnetts caring for community

12 April 2024, 6:43 AM

Cancer care in Kiama received a helping hand yesterday when local garden and landscape centre, Burnetts On Barney, presented a cheque for $2000 to Kiama Lions Club for their Cancer Care Trust.The money was raised during a recent whole day of music which included local musicians Penny Hartgerink and Cha Cha Del Mar as well as Kiama Jazz and Blues Festival musicians. The event became a tribute day to one of the Burnetts’ team, Debra East, who died earlier that week after a short battle with cancer.Debra and her family had received assistance from the Kiama Lions Inc Cancer Care Trust and the Burnetts’ team chose to support this local charity which uniquely provides palliative care medicines to any Kiama residents.“The Lions Cancer Care Trust money is raised by people in Kiama for the people of Kiama and Debra would be pleased to know that customers of Burnetts were able to support a charity which had supported her”, said Elizabeth Burnett during the presentation.“This local charity works solely for the benefit of our own Kiama district community. The money stays here to help those who are touched by cancer. If it isn’t helping your family it is probably helping a family you know,” she said.Lions Club of Kiama Inc Cancer Care Trust was established in 1990 to help subsidise expenses incurred by cancer patients or their carers as part of their treatment. Each year it distributes more than $24,000 to Kiama residents.Burnetts will this Saturday (tomorrow) be hosting local musician Greg Brown who is currently raising money for Cancer Council and will be donating all proceeds from his gig at The Quarry Café at Burnetts. The East family have also donated a voucher to Doyles Restaurant in Watsons Bay which will be raffled to assist Greg’s fundraising. Come and enjoy Greg’s music between 9.30am and 12.30am or donate online at https://www.doitforcancer.com.au/fundraisers/gregbrown27729.

West Kiama (Springside Hill) Development faces preliminary setback as Kiama Council recommends delay
West Kiama (Springside Hill) Development faces preliminary setback as Kiama Council recommends delay

12 April 2024, 6:27 AM

In a recent development regarding the proposed West Kiama (Springside Hill) development (Planning Proposal 2023-2833), the planning staff of Kiama Council have recommended against advancing the formal assessment and approval process.The Council's planning staff have submitted a report advising against the progression of the proposal to the NSW Government Gateway portal at this juncture. Instead, they suggest that the site be considered within the framework of the Council’s ongoing Growth and Housing Strategy.This recommendation comes ahead of the upcoming Council Meeting scheduled for 5pm on Tuesday, April 16th, where the staff report will be presented for consideration by Councillors as item 15.1 on the agenda.Additionally, during this meeting, Council is set to receive a petition regarding the West Kiama (Springside Hill) development, which has garnered 642 signatures. The petition, available for public review in the Business Papers under item 17.9, highlights community interest and concern regarding the proposed project.Kiama Council encourages members of the public to engage with the provided reports to gain a comprehensive understanding of the situation. Furthermore, all interested parties are invited to observe the Council meeting either in person or via Livestream.For more information and access to meeting materials, visit: [Kiama Council Meetings](https://www.kiama.nsw.gov.au/meetings)

South Coast Rail Disruption Highlights Region's Vulnerability
South Coast Rail Disruption Highlights Region's Vulnerability

12 April 2024, 5:40 AM

Illawarra residents have found themselves grappling with disruptions to their rail services ever since the deluge hit the area in the early hours of Saturday morning. The cancelled or restricted services have highlighted the precarious state of the South Coast train line. Thursday, buses continued to replace South Coast Line trains between Kiama and Bomaderry.Trains on the rest of the South Coast Line are running to a reduced timetable between Sydney and Kiama and between Wollongong and Port Kembla.The reduced timetable resembles a weekend timetable. Commuters are advised to allow extra travel time, listen to announcements and check information displays for service updates.NSW Transport announced that following last week’s extreme weather, urgent track repairs were required on the South Coast line with damage occurring at Coalcliff and between Kiama and Bomaderry. Buses will replace trains between Wollongong and Waterfall on both Saturday and Sunday. 250 Sydney Trains crew worked continuously over a 90 hour period to repair 200km of track and restore services north of Kiama by Tuesday morning this week.Work between Kiama and Bomaderry is still underway, with truckloads of ballast being delivered to Berry station to restabilise rail lines.250 Sydney Trains crew worked continuously over a 90 hour period to repair 200km of track and restore services north of Kiama by Tuesday morning.Tony Horneman from the Illawarra Rail Fail community group expressed the all-too-common frustration among commuters, citing the lack of infrastructure investment as a glaring issue, particularly during severe weather events.He told the ABC: "Down the South Coast the commuters have kind of got used to this. We have a third world rail service on the South Coast line and most people have developed a Plan B, but the reality is not all of us can work from home."There's a lot of jobs where you have to be physically at work, like at Sydney Airport, so they have to come up with creative ideas."Minister for the Illawarra, Ryan Park, has assured residents that efforts are underway to expedite repairs, acknowledging the vital role of the railway in the region's commuter network.However, the disruption isn't just logistical; it carries significant emotional and financial burdens for residents. As Transport for NSW assesses the damage and works towards restoring normalcy, residents confront the harsh reality of their region's vulnerability to extreme weather events and the pressing need for sustainable infrastructure and comprehensive support mechanisms.

Battle of the Businesses
Battle of the Businesses

12 April 2024, 5:20 AM

After 12 weeks of training, the fight is on. Rodney Zarif, father of three and manager at KD Cellars in Kiama Downs, got caught up in the Battle of the Ages, well the Battle of the Businesses, purely on a whim. The event, which raises money for the Illawarra Convoy, had its first outing last year and has been such an instant success it is already set to become a fixture on the annual calendar. There will be 40 businesses battling it out to be top dog, with Rodney as optimistic about his changes as he can be. Especially as he is up against the rather alarmingly named Jason Murdzevski from Flash Homes. The finale of all the hard work that has gone into the event will be on Saturday 20th at WIN Entertainment Centre.Last year the Convoy raised $2.85 million for children’s charities in the Illawarra Area. But for Rodney it wasn’t so much noble intentions as an impulse, when he saw an advertisement on Facebook looking for participants in the Battle of the Businesses Boxing Championship and thought: “Why not?”“I had a little bit of training when I was younger, and boxing was something I have always wanted to do,” he said. “I didn’t tell my wife at first, but I got accepted. And it was something my wife couldn’t say no to, because it was for charity. “Everyone is put through 12 weeks of intense training, three or four times a week. As soon as they said yes I started focusing on diet and training. “I am nervous about the actual fight, but health wise it has been awesome. It has changed my life in terms of fitness. They teach you boxing. The fitness side of it’s crazy. “Sometimes you are sore and don’t want to go to the gym, but you just have to push yourself. “Now that I have done it, I appreciate how difficult a two minute round of boxing is. You just feel drained. The biggest challenge has been events coming up, tempting me to eat bad or have a couple of drinks. “I am looking forward to it. I am a bit nervous, but… “Originally I wasn’t going to tell anyone, but obviously they want us to advertise for the event. It has been a good experience. The friendships you form at the gym, and networking business wise has been awesome. All sorts of people are involved, lawyers, real estate agents, electricians, there is just a massive mix. “And it is for a good cause.”  Other businesses and individuals involved include Rebecca Moystn of Mostyn Legal, Steve Lozenkovski from Bears Auto Group, Tiarna Katrivesis from Fitness Express Shellharbour and Rob Mitchell from A Class Building.Spokeswoman for the event Karlie Zec said we wanted to try and think of a fund raising event that would bring something different to Wollongong and raise a lot of money. “I think we’ve succeeded,” she said. “We have all sorts of businesses from all over the Illawarra. We deliberately picked people who hadn’t boxed before and gave them the training they needed.“All the people from the various businesses get involved and we have sold more than 1200 tickets so far. It has created a great atmosphere, we all see other at the gym and it has become more of a family than a friendship.”   The Battle Of The Businesses boxing tournament is sponsored by Tiny Tins, Wollongong Crane Trucks and Grechys Boxing & Fitness.Doors open at 4.30pm for a 5.30pm start on Saturday 20th of this month at the Wollongong Entertainment Centre. Tickets are available from Ticketmaster and start at $90.

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