The Bugle App
The Bugle App
Your local news hub
Get it on the Apple StoreGet it on the Google Play Store
FeaturesThe Bugle: latest issue24 Hour Defibrillator sitesSportsWin StuffKCR
The Bugle App
Three times gold for Kiama Downs SLSC
Three times gold for Kiama Downs SLSC

21 July 2024, 9:33 PM

Kiama Downs (NSW) won three gold medals in a close Masters Competition Final in the 2024 SHARKSKIN Australian IRB Championships on Saturday, 20 July.The Illawarra club also bagged two silvers and a bronze to finish atop the overall podium on 38 total points.  Broadbeach SLSC (QLD) came in second with 27 points and Alexandra Headland (QLD) third with 25 points.  Key to Kiama Downs’ success was Stephen Strong, who after 40 years of competing for the club, has announced his retirement from the sport of IRB racing.  “To retire on a win like this, you can’t script it,” he said to Surf Life Saving Australia. “People dream about it and I’m very lucky. “I’m just over the moon.” Adding to the occasion was getting the win over rivals Broadbeach. “There are only two clubs on the trophy, us and Broadbeach,” Strong said. “We’ve had a bit of a battle for the last couple of years, we won it, then they held onto it for a few years. “But it's nice to get it back, that’s pretty special.” In his swansong National IRB Championships, Strong added another gold (Male Teams Rescue) and a silver (Male Surf Race) to his medal cabinet.  2024 Masters Championship PointscoreKiama Downs – 39 points Broadbeach – 28 points Alexandra Headland – 25 points Caves Beach 22 – points Bondi 14 – points Kurrawa 13 – points Queenscliff 7 – points Thirroul 6 – points Port Noarlunga 4 – points Kirra 3 – points Nobbys (NSW) 3 – points Brighton 2 – points Barwon Heads 13th Beach 1 – point 

Local Group 7 referee reaches 600 game milestone
Local Group 7 referee reaches 600 game milestone

20 July 2024, 7:54 AM

Group 7 referee Nick Mcinerny reached an extremely impressive milestone on June 30 when he refereed his 600th grade game.McInerny, who has been refereeing since he was 13 years old, says that his true love for the sport and continued support from family and friends is what brings him back year after year.“I started out as a 13-year-old and I did it because I was having a lot of injuries in my last year of footy in under 13s. And I wanted to take it up to stay involved in the sport. It does take its toll, you’ve got to have good support from the family and friends around you, which I’d be lost without,” says McInerny.Since beginning, McInerny has watched both the sport and refereeing evolve and he is so happy to see females finally being able to get involved.“There are a lot more games these days than there were when I first started. The games have gotten quicker, there's a lot more female participation now which is great to see, both playing and officiating which is good. And that’s one area which will be an issue going forward with all these other grades, having enough officials going forward,” says McInerny.Referees are as vital to rugby league as having a field to play it on, and yet they are subject to a lot of unfair abuse from players, coaches and spectators.This unfair abuse is one reason why referees are becoming scarce, and McInerny’s wish is that people involved in the sport would be more empathetic towards them.“Group 7 has been pretty positive in trying to foster a family attitude at games, unfortunately that isn’t always the case. Unfortunately there are still some people who believe that they paid their money to get into the gate so they can say what they want and do what they want,” says McInerny.“Some of the comments that I have had over the years have been quite derogatory, and people have just got to remember that we are all human, we will make mistakes which is part and parcel of the game, but we don’t go out there to deliberately make mistakes,” says McInerny.McInerny loves a game with a good atmosphere and teams having a real battle. Some of his most memorable games have been the various grand finals he has officiated which includes the 2013 grand final between Gerringong and Warilla which ended in golden point.“If you can get a game of footy where the two teams just play football and you can walk off the field after the game and no one talks about the referee, then I think the referee has done a great job in that game,” says McInerny.Fellow referee Ryan Micallef speaks very highly of McInerny and his service to both the game and the Group 7 Referees Association.“Nick is the kind of bloke to go about his work quietly and without any fuss. To do 600 career-grade games is a testament to his long-term dedication to officiating & rugby league in general. On top of his on-field refereeing, Nick has spent numerous years holding administration positions within our association, continuing to move us forward,” says Micallef.Group 7 Referees Association President, Jarrad Borg nominated Nick for a life membership in 2018 and is forever grateful for his wisdom and advice.“For myself, starting as a junior referee in 2007, Nick has been a cornerstone of my journey as both a coach and mentor. His extensive knowledge as a referee and his willingness to provide honest feedback made him an invaluable resource for all of us,” says Borg.McInerny assures that he is not quite finished yet, next he aims to reach the 300 first grade games milestone which has only been reached by one other referee in Group 7 history.

Local rugby player chosen for state game
Local rugby player chosen for state game

20 July 2024, 3:40 AM

Kiama Rugby Club gun, Jack Hobbs, has been selected in the prestigious NSW Country Cockatoos team to represent his state. Hobbs was picked in a 39-man squad based on his performance for the Illawarra representative team back in June. Jack Hobbs playing for the Country Cockatoos. Source Jack HobbsOn Saturday July 13 he had his first training session with the squad and from there they will narrow the squad down to just 28. If Hobbs is to pass through this process it will be his fifth time representing NSW. “This is my fifth time in a row. I started in 2019 and played every year since then. Once you’re in, it's a bit hard to get out,” says Hobbs. “As long as you’re playing good footy they want to keep a similar team. But there’s always good young boys coming through and I’ve been lucky.” The Cockatoos will play for the Australian Rugby Shield in the Sunshine Coast in October and Hobbs says that the quality of play is incredibly different from local rugby. “It's an honour to put the jersey on representing our state and I really enjoy doing it. It’s a big step up. I wouldn’t say it's professional, but it's a few steps up from playing first grade local footy. Everyone knows their job and it's a lot faster,” says Hobbs. Hobbs has played at the Kiama Rugby Club for the last two years after moving there from the Wollongong Vikings, and he says it’s helped him grow as a player. “They’ve got a lot of good players at Kiama. We had nine selected in the Illawarra team - the most players out of everyone. It's just good to be playing with other good players and it’s really made me step up and be a bit of a leader,” says Hobbs. President of the Kiama Rugby Club, Mark Bryant, speaks very highly of Hobbs and the qualities he has brought to the club. “Since he joined the club he’s been an absolute workhorse on the field and off the field. He pushes everyone and he’s a very good rugby athlete. His defence is impeccable, he's got attacking skills. He's very classy and he's hard. And there's no malice in his play, it's always clean rugby,” says Bryant. Kiama are currently sitting at third on the Illawarra District Rugby Union ladder and have only lost one game in 2024 to the first place Shoalhaven team, but Bryant is confident they can hit back when they play again next week. “Even though we got beaten in the first round by Shoalhaven, the first 2 tries were lucky, and we won the second half, so we have a real chance to knock them off next week,” says Bryant. Since Hobbs joined the club in 2023 the Kiama team has improved immensely from coming seventh and eighth in 2022 and 2021 respectively. Hobbs is also the brother of Clayton Hobbs and together they run Claytons World which has over 28 million likes on TikTok. You can find their TikTok account here.    

Summit Shoalhaven trail run attracts record number of entries
Summit Shoalhaven trail run attracts record number of entries

19 July 2024, 12:55 AM

Once known as the King of the Mountain, the grueling Summit Shoalhaven trail run returns on 28 July. The 2024 version has seen a record number of entries, making it the largest Summit Shoalhaven and King of the Mountain trail run ever held.Seasoned trail runners and weekend warriors alike are drawn to the rugged terrain of Mount Scanzi and Kangaroo Valley.The revival of a historic eventOriginally established in 1966 as the “King of the Mountain” by a dedicated group of running enthusiasts from the Nowra Athletics Club, the trail run has grown significantly since then. After a hiatus over several years, the event transformed into Summit Shoalhaven, keeping the spirit and the challenge of the original run, including water crossings and challenging ascents.40km runners on Illaroo Fire Trail at Lower Bugong at Lower Bugong Rd (2022). Photo credit: Hew Colless/Creative Soup MediaScones and cream are offered at the finish line, courtesy of Bakehouse Delights in East Nowra. This tradition has been a staple since the event’s inception and adds a sweet touch at the end of a hard run.New challenges aheadThe updated courses for the new 54km and 36km routes feature a total gain of 1,158 metres, incorporating more vertical gain than ever before, through the magnificent wilderness of the Shoalhaven. Participants will navigate varied terrains, with over 82 per cent of the course consisting of fire trails, plus some single-track and off-road terrain. The all new courses are continuous loops.Join the adventureWhether you’re aiming to conquer the 54km, 36km, 21.1km, or more accessible 11km, find more information at Summit Shoalhaven.

A ceremony in France honours fallen Australian Olympian and WWI soldier
A ceremony in France honours fallen Australian Olympian and WWI soldier

17 July 2024, 10:42 PM

On 17 July, former Olympians Kaarle McCulloch and Michelle Ford, honoured the memory of the late Cecil Healy, the only Australian Olympic gold medalist to die in combat, at a ceremony in France.The pair laid wreaths and flowers on Healy’s grave at a war cemetery in the small French village of Assevillers, an hour north of Paris.Freestyle swimmer Cecil Healy, who won gold and silver at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics Games, was killed in France just 73 days before the end of World War One. A member of the 19th (Sportsman’s) Battalion, 2nd Lt Healy and the other Australian soldiers had come to liberate the villages of the Somme area when he was gunned down on 29 August 1918. His death was keenly felt in the Australian Olympic movement, not only because of his exceptional qualities as a swimmer, but particularly for the extraordinary act of sportsmanship he displayed at the Stockholm 1912 Games.Cecil Healy in Paris. Photo courtesy: John Devitt and Larry WriterHealy denied himself a certain gold medal by insisting the race favourite Duke Kahanamoku be allowed to compete in the 100 metres freestyle final, despite the American champion missing his semi-final due to an apparent mix-up.His stance led to officials holding a special semi-final, which included Kahanamoku. The American went on to win the final with the Australian picking up the silver.Healy felt that without Kahanamoku in the race, any gold medal would be tarnished.“What stands out is his leadership, his bravery and his sportsmanship. And of course, he was such a wonderful athlete. Accounts of his life paint a vivid picture of a great Australian who lived his Olympic values. What a tragedy that he lost his life at a young age with the First World War coming to an end,” said Kaarle McCulloch, Australian Olympic Team Deputy Chef de Mission and dual Olympic track cyclist.Cecil Healy in uniform. Photo courtesy: John Devitt and Larry Writer.“He and Duke Kahanamoku were obviously great friends with the Duke’s visit to Australia in 1914 putting surfing on the map in Australia. And now surfing is an Olympic sport – something that Cecil and Duke Kahanamoku could not have imagined back then.”Dual Olympian and Moscow 1980 gold medallist swimmer Michelle Ford joined the commemoration honouring Cecil Healy’s courage, as did Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister Patrick Gorman MP, Australia’s Ambassador to France Ms Gillian Bird PSM and the Mayor of Assevillers Didier Jacob.

1-20 of 490