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Turners Rage by James Seymour


Turner's Rage: Chapter Five
Turner's Rage: Chapter Five

07 April 2024, 7:34 AM

Keep track of the characters here <Turner's Rage: List of Characters>The Black Swan Pub, Ewell …The Coach from Guilford arrived in Ewell late in the afternoon. Having been cramped up in the coach for several hours, Jonathan Turner was tired and hungry, anxious for a good meal and a long talk with his brother Richard. Since his meeting with Hamish McPherson early this morning, there were some urgent issues for their discussion.Hamish had grand plans for the south of England and would establish a pub near the Epsom Downs racecourse. A calendar of regular race meetings, including some of the national race days, indicated growing crowds and patronage. When Jonathan mentioned his brother in Ewell, who ran a pub, Hamish’s curiosity was aroused. Hamish suggested that Richard might be interested in managing the new pub. Jonathan turned this proposal over and over all day, and by the time he arrived, he was keen for dinner and their discussion. Richard’s pub, The Black Swan, was ahead down the street—a hired man followed with Jonathan’s bags. The establishment was three floors high with a grand entrance that appeared slightly run down. Richard must improve the external appearance of the pub before Hamish visits. Jonathan would include this on the agenda for tonight. In the lobby, Jonathan recognised Oliver, Richard’s eldest son. “Uncle Jonathan! Welcome. Father said you were coming today. We have a fine room ready for you.”“Oliver. Good to see you again. The coach was cramped, and I am thankful for a good stretch. Some dinner and a soft bed will be my desire tonight.”“You travel on to London tomorrow?”“Yes, I do!”“We will make sure you have a good night’s rest.” Later that evening, the two brothers sat in Richard’s small but well-decorated private dining room, having a hot meal and wine as they caught up on family and business matters. Sarah, Richard’s wife, joined them for the main course but now left them to their business discussions. Jonathan did not hide his excitement about his new business acquaintance, Hamish McPherson.“You see, Richard, he is planning three or four pubs in strategic locations south of London, and Epsom has the attraction of some well-known races.”Richard said, “Pity he was not more flexible and would consider Ewell!”“Your arrangement with the Lord of the Manor is distressing you. Why not consider cancelling that arrangement and taking on the management role at Epsom? Start afresh with some significant backing. Both Hamish and I would invest in the new pub. We need someone like you who understands the business.” Jonathan was hoping for Richard’s commitment. “Yes, I could, but an owner would still constrain me. I aim to control my own business! I envy you, Jonathan, in that you control your interests. Having never achieved this, it is time I did. I have been giving it much thought over the past two years, and if I don’t move soon, I may be too old for such a move.”Jonathan was encouraged by what he heard. “However, it is more than just changing pubs. My need is more capital. The business here will not generate this. A friend recently informed me that the government is offering land, free title, for those who will settle in South Africa. A grant of land free of charge may be the opportunity to open the future for me. I could go out there for five years, set it up, then sell and return with some capital in my pocket. Who knows what other opportunities might arise? There is gold in South Africa, and many have gone there prospecting.”Jonathan sat back and rubbed his hand across his chin. This proposed change in direction by Richard took him by surprise. Moving countries was a more significant challenge than what he was suggesting. But that was Richard – he was a risk-taker.His brother continued. “If I can keep the pub going here and settle in South Africa, this will work. Oliver is now twenty-six and quite capable of managing it. His brother, Harry, is two years younger and well acquainted with the business. I would free up Oliver for what you are suggesting in Epsom. It is unlikely that I will leave until next year, so I could keep an eye on Oliver and assist with the new pub. I would also train Harry for Ewell before I go. McPherson could join us and show us any new ideas he desires implemented. The training should all be complete by the time we leave for South Africa.”“Surely!” Jonathan interrupted, “You would take Oliver and Harry with you? You would need their help.”“In the first few years, we will be grazing cattle and sheep, and plenty of locals are available for farm work. I will hire supervisors who know the local customs and hiring of staff. My boys will be better off here, developing the business. England is their home, and they have no desire to leave. It is funny, but they have been growing apart from me for some time. I think they would prefer me out of the business so they can make their mark. Young men need their turn, just as I did. You will recall how I stepped out in faith many years ago and set this business up. That is me. I like a challenge.¹¹ British Settlers were encouraged to take land grants near Grahamstown (Makhanda) west of Port Elizabeth (Gqeberha) in the early part of the nineteenth century. Many failed and the land was either transferred or sold on. Wikipedia.I will take Sarah and Katherine. Firstly, we will set up the farm and then build a farmhouse. During the first six months, I will become acquainted with the locals. I hear there is a growing community of English farmers.” Jonathan was surprised by this move and considered the implications of what Richard was suggesting—making Oliver the manager might well work. Hamish would like this as Oliver would be young and searching for new ideas – having his father as a backup would also mean a mentor on-site for some time. Jonathan would ensure Richard remained in England for at least a year. Hopefully, it would be 1828 before Richard went overseas and not 1827.The brothers talked about the new Epson pub until Jonathan changed the subject. “Discuss this venture with your boys tonight, Richard, as I must go tomorrow morning and give Hamish an answer. I will return from London on Thursday and advise you of the outcome. However, there is another matter where I seek your advice. A matter of great confidentiality!”Jonathan described the incident with Eleanora and how she banished him to the guest room. He explained how he addressed the situation but could not find a satisfactory solution. Richard drank a glass of red wine as he listened with interest.“Jonathan, you have landed yourself in a pickle with your wife!” Jonathan, leaning forward in his chair, agreed. “Yes, well, it was my fault! As you know, I have a problem with rage. When she refused me, I lost control! It should never have happened, but I succumbed to my desires. The restraint needed last week has been terrible, and I struggle with my need for comfort.”Richard had a sparkle in his eye. “Jonathan. You are not the first man with this problem. Many a man in our society takes a mistress not only for satisfaction but also for the company.”“I have pondered this thought, and it does not sit well with me. Yet I am in great want of satisfaction. My life has changed overnight, and it is because I cannot control my rage. The thought of a mistress is tempting, but I have resisted. The problem is that I find it difficult reconciling the taking of a mistress, firstly due to my beliefs and secondly, it would be a breach of my trust relationship with my wife.”Richard smiled, “Father taught you well about the church. Pity he missed me on that count! I struggle with belief in God. I never accepted the faith you have – I have tried but have not found any divine inspiration or answers. For me, life is simple - there is no struggle. I do not envy your struggle with Christian principles. However, with your wife, if you have beaten her, then I am surprised she trusts you at all, Jonathan!” “I have apologised and vowed that it will never happen again. Eleanora has accepted this, and I am fortunate, but it does not solve my problem.” “Why, if I tried that with Sarah, she would have beaten me and thrown me out of the pub. You are fortunate that Eleanora is so understanding.” Richard took another sip of red wine and sank deep into thought.“I am. I am!”“And returning to William, you say the boy saw you beating her?”“Yes, I saw him peeking around the corner of the bedroom door.”“I told you about having children long ago, Jonathan. You should have listened. Did you give him a beating, too?”“I should have, but I had other reasons for avoiding this. William is six and a half, and a slip of the tongue could be dangerous for my reputation. He has a will of his own, and I am afraid he might inadvertently expose me, leading to humiliation in the community. For now, I have convinced him that it was a bad dream.”“Are you and he close, Jonathan? Can he be reasoned with?”“Not really - he dotes on his mother and has strong desires. I think it fair to say he and I irritate each other.”Richard pondered this and then said in jest, “This really could become a problem then! Perhaps South Africa is a solution. He may come in handy, given Oliver and Harry are not coming.”While Richard was not seriously suggesting this, Jonathan looked interested in the idea and mused, “This might become necessary!” Jonathan took a last sip of wine, “Let me know tomorrow morning of your discussion with your sons. I shall join you at breakfast.”Richard stood and said, “I will think about your satisfaction problem and consider alternatives.”Jonathan shook hands with Richard and then proceeded to his room. The hallways of the pub were attractive and well-kept – far better than the exterior. It was a well-furnished and comfortable hotel with soft carpets that made little noise as you walked down the hallways. Jonathan Turner was thinking of snuffing the candle flame when a soft knock came at his door. Not expecting anyone, he was surprised by the interruption. Being tired and needing sleep, he was in two minds but decided to answer the knock. Moving from his bed, he opened the door. In front of him, there stood a well-dressed, attractive young woman.She asked in a low, calm voice, “Jonathan Turner?”“Yes.”She walked past him saucily and sat on the end of his bed. Jonathan closed the door, suspicious of who this woman was. He may have been tired, but his brain was now running fast. He suddenly shuddered, realising this was his brother’s solution for his lust - arranging a woman for him! In the doorway, the light was low and restricted his vision. Now, she sat on his bed; he admired her detail. She was young, around twenty-five, with a beautiful figure, if not a little plump in some areas. The heightened colour of her cheeks was perfect, her hair was as long and blonde as his wife’s, and her perfume was light but intoxicating. She was there for the taking – handed to him on a platter - a gift from the establishment. No questions asked.Jonathan felt himself becoming aroused and walked back and got into the bed. He sat there, considering her. “My name is Francene. I am yours for the night, Jonathan.” She stood up, slowly unfastened her dress, revealing her lingerie, moved up the bed, and sat before him. “Well?”He remained silent. For Jonathan Turner, this was a defining moment. His marriage was a faithful one for twenty-four years. He now found himself with a delicious woman sitting nearly on his lap, offering him everything he wanted for the night – no questions asked. What kept ringing in his brain was his promise, ‘Eleanora, you are the only woman I have ever loved and will always be the only woman I love.’ Was he faithful to this? Of course, he meant this, but love and lust were two different things. Surely, he was assisting his wife by using another woman for his desire, saving her from this action. But then he recalled Reverend Taggart’s sermon on sin. ‘Sin not only affects ourselves but all those around us. We can pretend it is confined and justify in that way, but it also hurts the ones we love.’ Jonathan thought, ‘Damn, Taggart and his preaching!’ After loosening her corset, she put her hands on his shoulders and slowly leaned forward, exposing her soft, firm breasts. He wanted this so badly. He put his hands on her waist so she could not move further forward. She felt soft and wonderful. He breathed in her perfume, like rose petals all around him. Surely, if no one knew, no one would be hurt! He wanted her lingerie off so he could join with her. Her touch aroused him so much that sweat beads formed on his forehead. She smiled and gently licked his lips with her tongue. He felt himself submerging under this harlot’s spell. He pulled the covers away to roll this dream into his bed. She smiled again and kissed his chest, rubbing her hair across his face. He pulled her closer so her nipples were on his chest. It felt so good.Eleanora’s soft voice came from inside his mind, ‘I must learn to trust you. Can you assure me it will never happen again? Can I trust you?’ The voice was quiet but determined.Jonathan Turner was well educated, attending a Christian church with good preaching each Sunday. There was no escaping his understanding of the responsibilities of marriage. He was a man whose word was his bond. He had a conscience. Horrors such as little Olivia being suffocated in his chimney deeply angered him. He loved his wife.Then, in a flashback, he saw the little boy peeping into his bedroom. His face showed confusion, and then he scampered away. His mind was ashamed when he heard Anne calling, ‘Wake up, Father, Wake Up!’ He looked up and only saw a ceiling. There was no one there except this half-dressed woman lying on his chest and kissing him madly. He took a deep breath.“Stand up, put your dress on and leave, please.” He gently pushed her into a sitting position.“Come on, big boy; it is yours for the taking. All free, no strings attached.” Francene was about to move forward and kiss him when he pushed her aside and looked her in the eye. “Don’t make me get out of bed, or you will be sorry!” Francene stood up and looked at him for a minute. “Your wife is a lucky woman, Jonathan Turner!”Jonathan replied, “No, I am lucky to have her trust and love!”Francene smiled, dressed, and quietly closed the door behind her. The Turner Household, Guildford …Eleanora was retiring for the night and was about to snuff the candle when Anne knocked and entered her room. Giving her mother a gentle hug, she seated herself on the bed. “Mother, finding a time to talk is not easy. There has been so much happening that the chance has not appeared until now. Father’s being away provides some quiet time for us both. The boys and girls are in bed, and the house is quiet, and I desperately need your advice on some things. I know you are tired, but perhaps we could spend a few minutes, Mother?”Eleanora smiled at her daughter. These must be pressing issues if Anne was so insistent. How much Anne reminded her of Beth, now nineteen and a governess at Woking. Bethany bloomed early, with long brown hair, the colour of her father’s. Jonathan found her the work with Reverend Upton, and the reports back from the good Reverend were very pleasing. Indeed, it would not be long before some eligible young bachelor asked for her hand. She wondered how Jonathan would cope with that. He would probably ask the young man about his wealth and connections! Ah, Beth – how much she missed her. But Anne, with her long locks of golden blonde hair, was blooming in more ways than beauty. While Eleanora suffered ill health, Anne took over responsibilities for the house and proved most competent. She confidently managed the inquiries of women twice her age at church and helped cement the friendship between Marion and Thomas. Who knew where that might lead? She was becoming an accomplished woman at seventeen without attending a finishing school – a daughter any family would appreciate. “Anne, let us talk, darling. Come sit beside me.” They sat on the large bed that Eleanora shared with Jonathan for so many happy years.Anne moved along the bed but then looked down as if she was gaining courage before speaking. She hesitated. “What is it, child? You know this is a mother and daughter talk, and it will go no further.”Anne‘s eyes became watery, and a tear rolled down her left cheek. “Mother, I think Jeb at the bakery is interested in me, and I’m unsure if I should respond. I like him but not romantically; he is a friend, and it must stay that way. If I became familiar with him, father would be annoyed. I do not want Jeb hurt. You know, father, he always says he will find someone worthwhile to marry me. But I am not ready to marry. I am happy at home, but home has been sad and painful these last few days. I fear the future. I was so afraid when you were injured – we must not lose you, Mother! I am so scared of what’s happening around me.”She burst into tears, clinging to her mother. Eleanora held her tight as she violently sobbed against her chest. Her mother whispered in her ear, “There, there, Anne, you are safe here. There, there.”Slowly, Anne regained her calm, drew back, and wiped her dripping nose and red eyes on a handkerchief given by her mother. “Anne, there has been so much you have dealt with over the last week. You have done it well and earned great respect, especially from your father. We deeply love you and understand you need some rest from those responsibilities. I am growing stronger by the day and will soon order Mrs Jennings around as before.”They laughed as Anne said, “She needs it – she has become a little bossy lately!”.“She is working hard, too. All these issues are new ground for her as well.” “Mother, what about Jeb? He is a fine man, and I am sure he is looking for a wife. But I am not ready for marriage – I am not even interested in considering marriage at present. I would never hurt his feelings, but I do not love him. There is so much I still wish to achieve. Visiting London, perhaps one day Paris, and see the sights. There is a world out there that I have never seen. Must I be married before this happens?” “No, not at all. But you will need a good chaperone. Perhaps your father and I can organise something like that for you next year. Perhaps Beth could go as well – you would enjoy that?”“Yes, Mother - Beth and I with a nice chaperone. It would be such fun. Why could you not come with us, Mother?”“Because I am with child, Anne!”In amazement, Anne said, “But we have not been made aware! Mother, in your condition, is it wise? What has Doctor Stephens said?”“He says the baby is fine, but the doctor has warned your father that he must leave me alone for several months. It will all be fine. Anne and I will discuss a trip next year for you and Bethany with him. Beth will be ready for a break and welcome the suggestion. That is if she is not married by then.”“Why, Mother, have you heard something we do not know?”“No. No. But Bethany is such a beautiful girl, just like you! There are bound to be eligible men lining up for her hand.”“Not if they know our father!”“Now Anne, your father is a good man, and he means well for all of us. Certainly, he makes mistakes at times, but don’t we all? When some young man calls upon him, we will draw our conclusions. It may not be a suitable match, as many issues must be considered.”“What do you mean by that, Mother?”“We, women, live in a predicament where we mostly do not own property. Our husbands usually take possession of any property coming with us in marriage. We do not have occupations; the vote is withheld from us, and we have little education. The men control everything. There are some women of wealth, and that is because their fathers were rich outside the aristocracy, and they legally willed it fairly for their children. But in most cases, the eldest son receives the lot.In families such as ours, there is some opportunity for the daughters. Where a business is grown, generating wealth, there will be an inheritance for the daughters. You have learned much of the baking trade without indentures! You have also attended the church school, but unfortunately, we could not find you a suitable finishing school. But Anne, you are well educated, and you shall have more as we send you on a trip with a chaperone.  We, women, must depend on our husbands’ love and generosity. So, in marriage, your spouse must have a suitable position and means. We do not want you in servitude, Anne. We want a better life for you - better than ours!” Anne nodded in agreement but then asked the question that had bothered her since last week.“Mother, after the beating you received from father, are you not afraid about the future?” “Why, Anne, you should not judge that I received a beating. You must understand that perhaps the wrong was your father’s and mine. Perhaps I should have been more accommodating.”Anne’s eyes widened, and she put her hand across her mouth, “Mother, No! It must have been so humiliating for you.” “Anne, Anne, now calm down. You must understand that when your father and I were married, it was not a marriage made in heaven. My parents selected him as they sought opportunities for me, but I needed convincing. I am sure Jonathan thinks it was all his charm, but there was far more involved than charm. My parents loved me very much and desired that the man who won my hand would provide a comfortable living for me. They succeeded more than they could have ever imagined. My parents never knew the luxuries that we afford now.”“If this is so, Mother – tell me – do you love father? And does he love you?”Eleanora looked at the painting on the bedroom wall of herself and Jonathan posing as newlyweds. She sighed. “Anne, the issue is, what is love? At first, I could not stand your father as he was insistent on union every night, and he did not have the manners of our family. He even resisted attending church, not understanding its importance for spiritual beliefs and business acquaintances. I often cried on my mother’s shoulder, but she also reminded me of a woman’s insecurity without a husband. She encouraged me to always look for the good things in him, and there were many. I’m sure he found me tiresome in the early years of our marriage as I bent him into shape.”Anne smiled and then threw herself backwards on the bed, giggling, “Bent him into shape – how I wish I had seen that.”  Eleanora smiled and giggled, too. “There were many funny little things that happened!”She lay down beside Anne and took Anne’s hand in hers. “You would be surprised, but it is from those little things that love springs.”  They gazed into each other’s eyes – mother and daughter.‘You mean you love him?”“Yes, marriage has bound us together, and we have made a life that I would never swap with anyone. Certainly, the romance was lacking at the start, but the man has devoted his life to our family. He is tough and can be wicked, but he can also be outstanding. I have not been the model wife, but we have been fortunate in childbirth, seeing some of our children become adults. We have shared these joys. We have laughed together, and we have cried together. Before everyone was up on Sunday morning, he made me a cup of tea and buttered rolls and brought them upstairs for the first time in our marriage. So, out of bad can come good. If you asked me if I love him, I would say I do. If you ask me if he loves me, I would say yes, I do. But perhaps you should ask him that, Anne. But not now!” She smiled, and Anne giggled. “Mother, what do I do about Jeb?” They sat up.“From what you tell me, you are not interested in a relationship yet. Anne, you show a lot of wisdom for someone your age. Friendship is ample; if he wants more, you must make him understand it is friendship only, and he must keep his distance. Jeb is no fool and will heed your advice.”“Thank you, Mother. I have been so confused. I so much love talking with you. Do you think I will ever find happiness like you?”“Let us see what develops in the next few years, shall we?”          “Mother. I nearly forgot. I have invited Marion and Mrs McPherson for afternoon tea tomorrow. Mr McPherson returns to London tomorrow for business, so some company for them will be welcome while he is away. If you are unsure of your health, I will look after them myself, but it would be good if you could attend.” “Now Anne, perhaps next time you should consult me before handing out invitations, but in this case, I will attend! Now it’s time for bed.”In the morning, Anne ensured that Mrs Jennings understood the arrangements for the afternoon tea. Anne frowned when a knock came at the front door as she was not expecting anyone. Mrs Jennings returned and announced Miss Marion Steele was waiting for Anne in the drawing room. Madeline, Simeon, and William were packing their bags before leaving for school. Clementine was checking that everyone had their lunch. “Your sandwiches, William, are they in your bag?” “Yes”.“Are you sure, as there are some sandwiches here on the table? Let me see.” Clementine opened his bag.“Brother, you must concentrate - there are no sandwiches in your bag – now put these in and catch up with Sim. Madeline, I will walk with you as Mrs. Jennings needs some items from the grocery store. Now, where is the money jar?”Anne left the organising and found Marion waiting in the drawing room. “Anne, please excuse me for visiting so early, but I was so bored as Mrs McPherson calls on the mayor’s wife this morning. Mr McPherson is at Dapdune Wharf, where he takes the Weybridge barge. For some reason, he loves barges and will also inspect the canal network between here and London. Could I come with you for a few hours today and see what you do at work? I am curious as I have never been allowed into a workplace – because of the ‘Lady thing’ in London, and this is my opportunity. I do so admire you and the freedom your father gives you.”Anne was amazed. Usually, it was the other way around; people disliked work. “It would be a pleasure, Marion, but you can’t come in those fine clothes. Come upstairs, and we will change you into some old clothes of mine. I will find you a smock. Are you sure about this?”“Yes. You probably think me a romantic, but I am so bored and fascinated by what you must do there. Also, perhaps we might meet Thomas!”“Ah!” Anne said, smiling slightly and thinking that Marion must be keen on Thomas! As she pulled out the best old clothes in her wardrobe, Anne wondered whether Marion was more interested in work or Thomas. “Now try these on – we must be quick, or I will be late. Father loves punctuality – even though he is away, I can feel him watching me.”Eleanora, carrying Marcia, walked in as Marion’s head popped out of the top of the smock. “What are you girls doing?”“Marion asked if she could join me at work for a few hours, and I thought it would be fun. Mr & Mrs McPherson are engaged this morning, so Marion is alone. But we must not let her ruin all her beautiful clothes at the bakery!”“Yes, yes, I agree. Have fun, girls.”“Thank you, Mrs Turner – my auntie is most excited about the afternoon tea.”The Church School, Guildford …Simeon, William, and Madeline crossed the busy street between horses, carts and other pedestrians and entered the Church school. William immediately dropped his bag and darted towards the game of cricket on the other side of the graveyard. Simeon picked up William’s bag and dropped it near the church’s back door at the bag stand.     Madeline slowly walked into school and sighed. She was not interested in school and would prefer staying home even if she was doing housework. The sight of her friends, Ruby Bowers and Dawn Luckett, cheered her up as they went into a huddle, talking and giggling about minutiae. Just before Reverend Taggart called the children in, Ruby whispered in Madeline’s ear that Richard and Caleb were plotting a fight with Simeon and William for today. She heard it was because Caleb’s teeth were knocked out, but she was unsure of the whole story. A frown came over Madeline’s face, and she dashed and warned Simeon. Simeon groaned, wondering whether this would ever end. There was nothing for it. He must ask for Reverend Taggart’s protection and quickly. The good Reverend was a man of action and sent William and Simeon on an errand while he thought out a strategy on hearing about the plot. He ushered them into his office when they returned an hour later with the goods requested. “Now, boys, you know how we have been learning about gravity? A day at home will allow you enough time to prepare an example. Tomorrow morning, you may demonstrate what you have prepared. Perhaps you could discuss the project with Anne and Thomas at the bakery this morning. Simeon, you can take care of William – I’m sure your parents will be happy with your supervision. When you get home, please explain why you are home early and the task I have given you.” He gave Simeon a wink. William was unsure what gravity was, but before he could ask Reverend Taggart, Simeon cut across him, “Certainly, Sir. We will come up with something.” Grabbing William’s collar, he dragged him off towards home. The Reverend Taggart thought, ‘Good, those two are out of danger. Now for some straight talking with Richard and Caleb.’William and Simeon grabbed their bags and set off for home. It was a beautiful day with a cloudless blue sky and a slight breeze from the west. William breathed in the summer air and felt the exhilaration of a perfect day for an outing. He wanted an adventure.“Simeon! Why should we go home? We could go on a hike in the forest. We could be knights in shining armour. I’ve always wanted to see what was over that hill across the river there.” William pointed at the highest part of the forest across the river Wey. The King’s hunting forest extended from Windsor to Guildford. It was a vast forest full of deer and other game that entertained royalty and their guests regularly. Simeon was not so keen. “I’m not sure we are allowed into that forest. At least not by ourselves.”“Then we shall never see it! Father will never take us. It would only be half an hour up to the top of the hill.”Simeon thought, ‘Maybe I could find a hollow log and a round stone that would roll down it. That would be a good example for the Reverend tomorrow.’“Ok, then. I have an idea for the example we might find up there.” Simeon’s interest was rising as he wondered what was over that hill. The two boys set off down High Street on their adventure. Once across the bridge, they walked along Portsmouth Road up to the first corner. They ducked through the fence into the trees and climbed over the pine-covered earth and rocks.The hill proved higher than expected, and it was a good hour before they reached the top, by which time it was nearly midday.“I can’t see Guildford at all; the forest is too thick,” William said as he peered around the trees. Simeon was scouting the terrain for a better vantage point. “Will, over there. I can see a rocky outcrop one hundred yards along the ridge.”  The two boys set out at a run for the vantage point. William got there first and broke into song. “Sim, look at this. I can see the whole town. Wahooooo……”Simeon arrived and set his pack down. “Wow. What a view!”Feeling hunger pangs, the boys decided on lunch. “It’s a good thing Clementine remembered your sandwiches, Will. They taste nice.” William turned and found Sim eating his lunch. “Hey, those are mine!”“You can have mine. Look in my bag.”William searched Simeon’s bag and found it empty of food except for about ten biscuits. Simeon grinned and said, “I ate my sandwiches at morning tea!” William was about to scream at Simeon when he stopped, dead still and slowly sat down. His face went white. Simeon, enjoying a thick sandwich, expected a reaction from his little brother but noticed William was white and silent. “What’s wrong?”William whispered, “Don’t…. Do not move, Sim. Just peek a look over your shoulder.”Simeon slowly turned his head. Not more than five steps behind him was a huge stag, nearly fifteen hands high, before adding the antlers. William was sitting facing the deer head-on. He saw it twitching its nose, smelling the sandwich and slowly waving its antlers. William whispered, “Throw the sandwich over your head. I think it fancies it.”Sim gently took hold of another sandwich and threw it quickly over his shoulder, landing at the deer’s feet. The stag started waving its antlers in rage. Then, three arrows flashed past the boys from the right, striking the deer’s side in a second. Thud, Thud, Thud. In fright, the deer raised its front hooves and crashed onto the ground, falling behind Simeon. Its antlers fell across his arm, breaking it. Simeon looked in horror as he felt the warmth of the deer’s breath expiring on his back. It did not move. William stood up and, from two feet away, watched as the deer’s eyes blinked madly and then just opened and became still.  “Good shot, Horace!” came a shout from fifty yards down the hill.A hunting party of ten horsemen came out from the forest further down the ridge. They shouted to each other in high spirits as they galloped up to where the boys were sitting. Simeon was crying out in pain as his arm hung limply by his side. Every movement increased his pain, and blood was streaming from a nasty gash. One horseman dismounted and ran up the rocks to the injured boy. “Good thing we turned up, or that stag would have cut you, boys, into pieces.” The horseman then noticed Simeon’s arm limp by his side with blood pouring from it. He could see the boy was in agony but keeping a straight face. “Let me have a look at that arm.” Simeon could not move. He noticed the horseman had a brilliant blue tunic and a quiver over his shoulder. An even larger man approached and stood on the rock, towering above the boys.He said, “What are you boys doing here?” William, frightened to speak, sat there with his mouth open.The large man thought the boys were poaching. He questioned, looking in William’s bag, “What have you got here? Ah, some biscuits – let me have a taste. I am a bit hungry.” He crunched onto one of the Turner bakery biscuits. “My, that’s good – where did you get these?” The first man looked up and yelled at the large man, “Horace, snap out of it, man! We have a serious injury here.” Horace, enjoying an exceptional biscuit made even better due to his hunger, turned quickly, “Yes, Sire.”Taking a quick look at Simeon, he bellowed at the party below, “Neville, quickly bring some bandages and splints up here. On the move, man! Now! Sir Cuthbert – you too, please. We could use help from your gentle hands.”Below, a horseman dismounted quickly dived his hands into his saddlebags, and pulled out some cloth and sticks. He raced up the rock face as if it were flat and put them beside the younger man tending Simeon. The man in the blue tunic asked, “What’s your name, boy?”“Simeon, Sir.”The larger man looked at Simeon and said, “You call him Sire, Simeon!”William said, “Yes, Sir.”In a rage, the man called Horace yelled at William, “Sire!”He yelled so loudly that William, in fright, started falling off the rock ledge. Horace leaned over and, in a flash, grabbed William with one hand and placed him back down safely. He breathed a sigh of relief and said, “We nearly had another casualty!”Quietly, he mouthed at William, “Sire!”“Yes, Sire”, William trembled. Horace said, “Where did you get these delicious crunchy biscuits, lad? I have not tasted anything as good before.”Feeling some friendship in the question, William said proudly, “From our kitchen, Sire!”Horace and the man with the blue tunic looked at each other and laughed. Not understanding the humour, William caught the joviality and laughed as well. The smaller man said, “By the look of you two, you are brothers. And what might your name be, brother of Simeon?”“William Turner, Sire.” William noticed that the smaller man had a magnificent blue uniform and could not have been more than a few years older than Anne. He also saw that all the men obeyed his commands. “Horace, give me one of those biscuits if any are left! I’m hungry!” “Why, Sire, I don’t think any are left!” Horace grinned.William was surprised at this and looked in his bag. “Yes, there is, Sire! Please have one.”The small man thumbed his nose at Horace and bit into the biscuit. “My goodness, you’re right, Horace. These are good! We must visit this kitchen.”  While this banter was going on, the other men, Neville and Sir Cuthbert, were gently splinting and binding up Simeon’s arm. Neville spoke softly, “Careful, Robert, this little chap is in a bad way. We must return him home quickly and have a doctor called.” “I’m aware of that! Now, William, you can ride with me, and Horace, you will carefully carry Simeon.” Neville placed a soft jacket under Simeon’s head. In a concerned voice, he quietly instructed Simeon, “Hold still as we bind these splints on. The more relaxed you are, the less it will hurt!”Simeon gritted his teeth, but the pain was too great. He started screaming but then saw white and passed out. The next thing he knew was waking and staring into the kind eyes of Doctor Jeremy Stephens.The “Sire” sent a man in advance for Doctor Stephens, requesting his services at the Turner’s house. The hunting party slowly headed down the hill towards the township. Directed by William, they made their way up North Street behind the houses and shops, the party doing their best not to attract attention. The ‘Sire’, Horace carrying Simeon and Neville, followed William’s directions across High Street, through an alley and around a corner at the rear of the Turner house, and entered along the back veranda and into the kitchen. The other party members stabled the horses at the Fox & Hound and decided on a hearty lunch as they waited.Anne and Mrs Jennings, who were preparing the afternoon tea, were surprised as the three men in brilliant tunics led by William entered the kitchen while the largest man, Horace, carried an unconscious Simeon. They stood there for a second or two in silence, looking at each other. The appearance of the men dumfounded Mrs Jennings. Anne was astonished that three knights could be standing in the kitchen facing them. Then she saw Simeon held gently in the arms of the larger man. William broke the ice, “Anne, Mrs Jennings, Is Doctor Jeremy here yet?” Anne replied, “Why no! What has happened to Simeon? My Goodness!”The man with the blue tunic said, “Our apologies, maids, for entering your kitchen, but the situation’s urgency demanded this. Master Simeon and Master William have been hunting with us, and Master Simeon was in an altercation with a rather large stag. The deer’s antlers have damaged his arm, and he is in much pain and passed out. He requires his bed. If you would lead us, please? “Mrs Jennings continued standing there with her mouth open. Anne immediately reacted.“Of course – please follow me.”She quickly led the way up the flights of stairs, Horace bending down carefully, avoiding the low doorways. The young man in the blue tunic quietly whispered, “William! Is Anne Mrs Jennings’s daughter or a servant girl?” “No, Sire, she is my sister!”“Ah!” Horace laid Simeon gently on the bed and withdrew backwards. As Neville knelt beside Simeon, checking his wound, the man in the blue tunic asked, “I am sorry, young maid. What is your name?”“Anne, Sir.”Horace called, “Call him Sire, young Anne!”Turning and looking up with a smile, Neville asked Anne for a bathing cloth, water, and another blanket until the doctor arrived. Anne called Mrs Jennings and requested the required items.The man in the blue tunic stood back as Neville continued monitoring the boy. “Is he a doctor, Sire?” Anne asked.“Yes, he is my physician. He is an excellent surgeon and will explain the exact symptoms and treatment required when the doctor comes.”He turned and looked at Anne. He found her most attractive. There was something special about this girl – she was full of life, and her beauty glowed from her. But there was something more that he struggled to understand. It was as if he knew her from somewhere else.Anne looked at him. She had never seen someone in such a magnificent uniform. The blue tunic must have been new as it was without blemish. The man in the blue tunic was amazed by the beauty of this girl called Anne. He could not take his eyes off her. Horace, noticing the focus of attention changing, mentioned the need for biscuits. The ‘Sire’ nodded his head out of a trance and said, “Yes. William was so good as to give us a biscuit each. We have never tasted a finer biscuit and learned they came from your kitchen. Might we sample some more, Anne? Neville will remain with Simeon.”“Certainly, Sire. However, I would rather remain with my brother until the doctor arrives.”The young man quietly said, “Anne, I would trust Neville with my life. He will be at Simeon’s side till the doctor comes. Your devotion to your brother is admirable, but he rests comfortably and is in safe hands. Neville will call us if required.”Anne nodded and reluctantly agreed and led the way. They passed the doctor rushing up the stairs. He stopped abruptly on a landing, allowing them past. “Thank you, Doctor Jeremy, for coming so quickly. Simeon is in his room with this gentleman’s doctor. They are waiting for you.”Jeremy Stephens’s eyes opened wide when he saw who was standing beside Anne on the landing. The ‘Sire’ said, “We are going downstairs for some biscuits. Should we send some up?”“No, thank you, Sire.” Jeremy Stephens hurried on.  They entered the kitchen, where Mrs Jennings continued preparing the afternoon tea. Horace looked at the spread in pleasure but noted his friend’s stern look. Anne took a deep breath and, steadying herself, asked, “Sire, I am sorry, but we have not been introduced. May I ask your name?”The man in the blue tunic turned wide-eyed, “My apologies, Anne. In all the rush with Simeon, I forgot the introductions. I am Robert South, and this gentleman is Sir Horace Coombes from Cornwall. Please call me Robert.”Anne smiled, “I am pleased to make your acquaintance, Robert. How did you come across William and Simeon?”“Ah?” Robert said. “Let me tell you the whole story while we have a biscuit at your kitchen table. Come join us, Horace.”Horace came from the doorway and gently parked his massive frame on one of the kitchen chairs. With a charming voice, he asked, “Any chance of a cup of tea, Mrs Jennings?”Mrs Jennings looked sternly at Horace and retorted, “I suppose you will want some of these cakes next!”Horace’s face broke into a begging smile, hoping for sympathy.Robert and Anne looked at each other, enjoying the banter, and began laughing. 

Turner's Rage: Chapter Four
Turner's Rage: Chapter Four

30 March 2024, 10:00 PM

Turner's Rage: List of Characters - Keep track of the characters here!Chapter 4The Turner Household, Guildford …Sunday morning was an important day for the Turner family, being the Sabbath and a convenient opportunity for meetings with influential community members and friends. Aside from spiritual issues, the cost of grain was always high on the discussion list. The Corn (grain) Laws¹ were a significant issue for landholders and the community, and Jonathan Turner delicately managed both parties.  ¹ The Corn Laws related to grains such as wheat, corn, and sorghum. The Corn Laws were legislated as a method of protection for British grain farming after the end of the Napoleonic wars in 1815. It kept the price of bread high. There was much opposition from the industrial workers in northern cities on limited wages. The corn laws suited the Aristocracy well. Being landholders, it maintained their income from corn harvests and allowed the maintenance of their worker’s wages. However, workers in the industrial cities were demanding the Corn Laws be repealed. This would result in a lower price for bread. Wikipedia.Jonathan was a shrewd businessman and understood the importance of good relationships with the landowners who supplied him with grain. Also, the business owners, customers and Guildford citizens were equally important to his business. The future of his baking and other companies depended on developing new markets, which both classes of society would support. Grain contracts with fair prices were essential for keeping his products at a reasonable cost. Church provided the opportunity to further relationships with suppliers and customers, ensuring their support. Waking early, he lay in bed, thinking through his marital predicament. Being in the guest room was not his preferred option. Eleanora remained quite cold towards him despite his talking with her several times since the incident. He now realised his abuse of her was inexcusable. At times, Jonathan’s behaviour was beyond his understanding. His problem with rage was unresolved, and somehow, he must find a cure. Now fully awake, he enjoyed the warmth of the early morning summer sun coming through the easterly-facing window. England was a beautiful place in mid-summer. His bed was now warm from the sunlight, and he felt a sense of energy and happiness. Being thankful for all the blessings his family enjoyed, Jonathan decided it was time to solve the situation with his wife. Jumping out of bed in his nightgown, he went downstairs to the kitchen, made two cups of tea, and found two crisp bread rolls and butter. With the offerings on a tray, he climbed the stairs and entered Eleanora’s bedroom. “Morning, my love!” Eleanora slowly rolled over, noticing the cups of tea and bread rolls and the pleading look on Jonathan’s face. His stay in the guest bedroom was having the right effect. She sat in bed, brushed back her long blonde hair across her shoulders and waited for his next move.“I brought you a cup of tea so we could talk before the day begins.” He sat the tray on the bedside table and passed across a full cup. Waking fully, she rubbed her eyes and looked at him. Was this the same man who beat her into submission the other night? She was pleased by his warm smile and the offering of an early morning tea and rolls. Eleanora took the cup, “Thank you, Jonathan. This is the first time in our twenty-four years of marriage that you have made me a cup of tea. Is there something that you want to say?”“Eleanora, my Dear, I have thought deeply about my actions the other night. I realised that I was wrong in what I did. My passion for you overcame me, and I lost control. I know I should have shown more control and failed you, but I am truly sorry and plead for your forgiveness. I truly love you and will always cherish you. Please forgive me, and let us put this behind us?”“Forgiveness now, Jon, requires change on your part. Firstly, I must be sure that this will not happen again, and secondly, I must believe I can trust you. Will you assure me it will never happen again? Should I trust you?” Eleanora took a sip of the tea. Jonathan Turner was not a man of great vocabulary. He struggled to find the right words that would win his case. So, he kept it simple. “Eleanora, you are the only woman I have ever loved and will always be the only woman I love. I will never let this happen again. I am ashamed of my actions and ask your forgiveness.”Eleanora was amazed that Jonathan was so repentant and wondered what had influenced this. She was still unsure he was genuine but would give him the benefit of the doubt. She also wanted this episode over and was quite content with his repentant state. “Jon, as you know, I am with child, and I am bruised and battered from your beating the other night. I am afraid of you and that you will turn on me. I will forgive you, but it will take time. You must give me more time.”Jonathan breathed a deep sigh of relief, leaned forward, and kissed her gently on the forehead. She leaned back on the pillows and watched him. “You shall have all the time you require, Eleanora. Here is a buttered roll for you and one for me.”Eleanora took the roll and felt a sense of relaxation for the first time since the incident. She realised the cup of tea and the roll was a peace offering. It was more important than anything else could be at this time. Jonathan’s repentance this morning had restored her husband and her marriage. There was a future again and another child on the way. A slight look of contentment came over her face.“The children will attend church with me this morning. Anne, Clementine, and Marcia will remain here with you. Mrs Jennings will bring your breakfast soon. Anne will keep you company while Clementine looks after Marcia until we return home. I will pray for forgiveness from the Almighty and a steady hand in the future. You have my commitment to this, Eleanora. Your welfare is my first concern, and regaining your trust is everything. We will make this work, Eleanora. We will make this work!”“Thank you, Jonathan,”“I will also be attending the Guild meeting in London this week. Brother Richard has requested I break my trip at Ewell to discuss some business matters. I will be gone on Tuesday, returning on Friday. Thomas will look after the bakery, and Anne will watch over the household while I am away.”“Jonathan, please give my apologies at church, as the ladies will notice I am missing.”“Of course, my Dear. I must go now, or I will be late.”Jonathan exited the room, and Eleanora watched until the door closed. She lay back on the pillows and smiled as the warm sunlight seeped into her room. The commitment made by Johnathan now assured her of a secure future. She felt a growing sense of calm, and a tear ran down her face – there would be a relationship for them again. Having lived with this man for twenty-four years, she knew him backwards. She now believed he was genuine and would make a change for the better. She closed her eyes and quietly gave thanks while she felt her stomach for signs of the baby.At breakfast, Jonathan looked around the kitchen. Mrs Jennings and Anne were busy serving, and Clementine shouted instructions at them all. William was teasing Marcia, who was becoming agitated. Simeon was quietly thinking and eating, probably still half asleep. He was a slow starter in the mornings. Thomas, having finished breakfast, was upstairs dressing for church.“William, leave Marcia alone!” “But Father, she loves it!” William cried out. Jonathan glared at William, and the boy took the hint that he should stop immediately. As the room calmed down, Jonathan thought through how he would handle the issues at church today.  “Anne and Clementine. You will remain home with your mother today. She will require company and assistance while we are at Church. I will need Thomas with me as there will be an important visitor and his wife who we must attend.”Clementine was happy with this, as she was not fond of the hour and a half at church on a Sunday morning. However, Sunday was the only time Anne met with friends and acquaintances. Missing this would be a disappointment indeed. Anne quickly assessed the situation – this must be diplomatically put and not arouse any suspicion.     “Father! Mother will not be attending! The ladies will ask after her; it would be better if one of us answered their inquiries. Given you will be busy with the menfolk and introducing Thomas, might it be better if I come and fend off any questions?”Anne was very respectful, ensuring her father would not become suspicious. Surely, he would understand that dealing with the lady’s questions was better left in her hands. It was in his interest that they presented a unified and consistent approach at church. She was not sure that her father knew of her knowledge of the incident, but she suspected he was quick on the uptake once hearing from William of her suggestion that it was a bad dream.“And what shall you tell the womenfolk, Anne?”“That mother fell on the stairs, and she suffers severe bruising, and Doctor Stephens insists she remains home resting this week.”Jonathan Turner was acutely aware, just as at any other church, that the gossip chain here was quick. He needed a counter against any rumours spreading. Anne’s suggestions sounded far more plausible. She was gifted at speech and would add creditability by giving a simple answer. Working together, they could dispel any rumours that might surface. “And if one of the ladies requests a visit, what shall you tell them?”“Simply that Mother is embarrassed by the bruising and should have subsided by next Friday, and she would welcome visits then?”Jonathan was pleased with this. It was a better plan than his. His daughter had a sound mind, and he must not ignore it. “Certainly, Anne, I think your plan is an excellent one. You shall attend Church and manage the ladies’ enquiries. I will confirm your comments if required. Let us be off soon, then.”William watched as Anne breathed a sigh of relief. He smiled at Anne as she walked past, and Anne stuck her tongue out at William but then smiled. Together, they were thieves of the truth but protecting their mother and father. Surely, this could not be wrong. The family house was not far from the church. As they walked along the street, William suddenly remembered his exploits with Richard Smith and Caleb Elliot. Simeon and William were last in the family line. Jonathan Turner led with Thomas at his side. They were busily discussing the corn laws, reflecting on what Jenkinson’s² next move would be in parliament. Anne and Madeline followed them. Much to Marcia’s disgust, Clementine and Marcia remained home as she doted on being with her father.  ² The Right Honourable Robert Jenkinson 2nd Earl of Liverpool, Prime Minister of the UK. Wikipedia.William nudged Simeon. He whispered, “You don’t suppose Richard and Caleb will be there?” “Of course they will! Perhaps not Caleb. ““Oh!”Simeon whispered back, “Just keep the pact.” “Did Reverend Taggart tell you about it?”“Yes, he did, and I agreed too, as I was the only other witness. If you say nothing, things will remain calm. If you say the wrong thing and others become aware, Father will beat us miserably, and I don’t want that.” Simeon was now speaking in an urgent but hushed voice. William nodded eagerly in agreement. As the family reached the church stairs, the Smith family were ahead. Jonathan Turner greeted the mayor warmly, who in turn reciprocated. Moving down the aisle towards their family pew, Jonathan nodded a friendly greeting at several gentlemen. The lady folk noticed Eleanora was not with them, and a ripple of side glances followed the Turner procession. Anne was correct in her predictions. As they moved down the aisle, Anne noticed the ladies passing hushed but concerned comments. Eleanora’s absence would be the hot topic of gossip after the service. Jonathan appeared very relaxed and smiled at one and all. He mouthed sideways, “I am glad you are ready for this, Anne, as I may have underestimated the concern!” Anne gave her father a reassuring smile, giving him some confidence.Four rows back on the other side of the Church, Jeb sat by himself in his Sunday best. Anne glanced around, smiling at friends; suddenly, seeing Jeb, she smiled at him. Jeb was so overcome he nodded back without any change in expression. Anne quickly looked forward as the congregation stood for the entering clerical procession. It was a good move as her father looked around at her and saw her nondescript expression as she gazed forward, concentrating on the empty cross. Noting this, her father thought no more of it. Anne relaxed. William and Simeon saw Richard Smith scowling at them in the pew directly opposite. Simeon ignored Richard, but William was petrified and looked down at his clasped hands as if he was praying. He remained that way for most of the service.The Reverend Andrew Taggart was a friendly, ordained man who loved his job. He was of the liberal tradition, which suited the congregation very well. His Church was a church of faith and an important social centre for the community. Bearing in mind the death of the chimney sweep, Olivia Stepton, and her funeral, Andrew Taggart searched the scriptures for comfort and was encouraged by what he found. Many of his congregation attended the funeral, including friends of the Easton family from Batton Place and associated tenants. This morning, he knew they would question why this accident occurred. Some may even be casting blame. He, too, wondered at times about sad incidents. For the Reverend Andrew, his sermon preparation increased the number of personal questions he considered about his faith. He was unsure of where it was leading, but the question of why these accidents happened needed answering. His sermon today was fragmented, confused and not very convincing. Each member of the Turner family had different expectations. Simeon had expected a lesson on love, and Anne thought an appeal for forgiveness might be appropriate. Jonathan’s mind dwelt on his upcoming conversations with customers, and Thomas was worried about being involved with Catholics. Madeline was starting to take notice of the boys about a year or two older than her.But Reverend Andrew Taggart surprised them all. His sermon was about ‘Sin’. He said he would develop this theme over the next few weeks and explain it as best he could each time. Unfortunately for the good Reverend, who had little theological training and far less in sermon giving, he made quite a mess of his first sermon on sin. By the end of the sermon, everyone was confused about the aim of his message. However, the longer he talked, the more relaxed he became. Most were thankful when the sermon finished, and the familiar prayer book liturgy for the eucharist commenced. At the time of communion, they all went forward in order of pews in two queues to the communion rails. William and Madeline remained seated as Anne quietly but firmly told Madeline not to move from her seat. As Anne followed her father forward, she noticed that Jeb was on the other side of the aisle in the other queue. As Jonathan Turner passed, he took Jeb’s hand, shook it, smiled, and patted Jeb on the back. He quietly said, “Thank you, Jeb, for all you did at the funeral.” Jeb smiled back at him, “It was my pleasure, Mr Turner.”Anne was surprised at how human her father could be. She looked at them both and thought how handsome they were but then checked herself, realising that any sign of familiarity might lead Jeb on unfairly and spoil their working relationship. Following the other family members, Simeon suddenly found Richard Smith beside him. Richard whispered in his ear, “Turner, meet me at the back of the Church after the service; bring little William with you!” Simeon swallowed backwards and nodded, wondering what this bully wanted. Richard was the typical spoilt brat who must have his way. Simeon was sure this would involve the events on Friday when he accidentally fell! After the service, as they exited the church, Mrs Smith, the Mayor’s wife, grasped Jonathan Turner’s hand.“Jonathan, where is Eleanora? I intended to invite her for afternoon tea on Tuesday, but she is not here. Is she unwell?”Jonathan smiled, “She is a little battered as the result of a fall, and at the request of Doctor Jeremy Stephens, she will remain resting at home till next Friday. But perhaps, Marjorie, you could discuss it with Anne, as I must catch up with the McPhersons while they are still here. Anne, come and talk with Mrs Smith about your mother, please.”Anne was quick in attendance and produced a lovely warm smile for Mrs Smith. “Certainly. Now, Dear Anne, do tell me all?”“Mrs Smith, I have been attending Mother since Tuesday last, and the swelling and bruising from the fall is slowly fading, but she is most reluctant about appearing in public or having visitors until the swelling goes down. But she is coping well and … .”Jonathan Turner left the two in deep conversation as the pair soon became a swarm of women discussing the topic. Pleased that Anne handled the situation so well, he gazed over the congregation, seeking Hamish and his wife so he could introduce Thomas. Thomas followed reluctantly, knowing his duty. “Good day, Hamish and Mrs McPherson. I am delighted you are attending our little church here. May I introduce my son Thomas, who manages the bakery!” Thomas was surprised to hear of his promotion but took it in his stride. Hamish McPherson owned four Scottish breweries, two in Glasgow and two in Edinburgh, and a string of pubs around the Scottish countryside. He recently built a brewery in Woolwich, invested in a pub in London and was now negotiating for a large hotel in Guildford. Jonathan Turner could see a significant future trade with Hamish if he settled here and built a chain of businesses in the accommodation and hotel industry.   “Jonathan, good to see you, and I am pleased to make your acquaintance, Thomas. Let me introduce my niece, Miss Marion Steele, who is with us for the next few weeks. She is from Woolwich, near London, and greatly enjoys your country town!”  Not expecting an introduction, Thomas was pleasantly surprised by the young lady. Marion was attractive and of a similar age, if not slightly older than Anne. “A pleasure, Miss Steele. Are you enjoying your stay in Guildford?” Overjoyed about meeting someone around her age, Marion was interested in Thomas and his sisters. “Yes, the fresh air out here away from London is lovely. I understand you have sisters, Mr Turner. Are they here today?”“Miss Steele, please call me Thomas. We are a little less formal out here at Guilford.”“Then please call me Marion.”Thomas nodded in agreement. He was most taken with the young lady and was unsure why Miss Steele was so friendly.  “Please let me introduce my sisters – I have five, but today, you must be content with the two who attend, Anne and Madeline. My oldest sister, Bethany, is a governess at Woking and attends church there. Clementine cares for my indisposed mother at home, and Marcia, the youngest, is also there today.” Thomas beckoned his sisters. Madeline acknowledged Thomas’s call and advised Anne, who politely excused herself and followed Madeline to meet Marion. It was apparent from the smiles and good wishes following Anne that she had settled the congregation’s women. The gossip network was well and truly under control. “Miss Marion Steele, may I present my sisters, Anne and Madeline.”“Delighted Miss Anne and Miss Madeline. It is so nice meeting some folk my age.”Anne twigged that this may be a significant introduction and was impressed by how beautiful Miss Steele appeared. She could see that Thomas was also finding Miss Steele’s company welcome. Quick thoughts of a future sister-in-law started flashing through Anne’s mind. Thomas’ sister was familiar with most resident families in the town and realised Miss Steele must be visiting. She would enjoy making a new friend. “Miss Steele, it is a pleasure. I do hope you are enjoying a lovely stay.”“Yes. I accompanied Mr McPherson and his wife, my auntie, who are currently talking with your father. It appears they have much in common. We are staying at the Black Moon Inn on Quarry Street, and perhaps you could join me for tea there later in the week.”Anne happily accepted this invitation, but another thought crossed her mind. “Why, Miss Steele, on a Sunday afternoon, we often stroll beside the river and enjoy the view. We also play a pirate game with the children. Father often supplies some biscuits for a picnic, which is most pleasant. If you have nothing planned, perhaps you would join our family for this outing today.”Thomas was astounded that things were moving this fast. What was Anne doing?“That is kind, Miss Anne – I would enjoy that very much. I must first check with Mr and Mrs McPherson; however, I am unaware of any appointments this afternoon, and it would be so refreshing joining with you and your family.”Marion quickly confirmed the arrangements with her aunt and uncle. Thomas and Anne found they were due at the Black Moon Inn at three in the afternoon and would escort Miss Steele down the High Street, meeting the others at the riverbank.Behind the church, Simeon and William looked for Richard. He dramatically appeared without warning from behind a gravestone. Standing menacingly above them, the Turner boys took a step backwards. He was a big lad for his age and stood a foot above them. Simeon knew he used his size as a weapon but also knew Richard was lazy and moved and reacted slowly.“Hey, Sim – I think your little brother here might have hit me from behind last Friday. I don’t fall over and hit my head – that has never happened!”“That’s what Reverend Taggart told us happened. Anyway, William was in class with me.” Simeon thought a little white lie would not hurt at this time, especially against a bully like Richard. Simeon wanted this line of questioning stopped before it went too far. He was not sure if William could hold his tongue.Richard commenced his tactics, “You are lying. Liar, liar, liar!” Simeon wanted this finished as he worried William would say the wrong thing. “Why not tell Reverend Taggart he is a liar? We’re only saying what he told us happened!”  William was impressed with Simeon’s quick thinking under pressure. He knew Sim would not be hurried in anything and was calm and calculated, but this deflection was clever. Unable to counter this fact, Richard lost whichever way he answered. Being a bully, losing was not an option. He decided on action rather than reason.   Richard rushed William, punching him hard in the eye with his right fist. The six-year-old went down like a sack of oats, holding his head in his hands. Simeon knew his turn would be next, so he backed up against a rather large but flat gravestone. Richard turned on Simeon and ran towards him with fists clenched. Simeon stood quite still, watching for the punch. He ducked sideways from the right-hand fist, inches away from his face. His observation of Richard’s processing information slowly proved correct. Simeon noticed Richard closed his eyes before his punch hit William’s eye socket. The pattern was similar in the schoolyard, where he bullied other children. Simeon assumed that once Richard’s arm commenced the punch, he would close his eyes and follow through.The timing of Simeon’s evasive action was perfect, but it was close. As he ducked sideways, he felt the rush of air against his cheek as the fist flew past and then collided heavily with the gravestone. It shuddered with the force of the punch. There was a loud crack of a breaking bone and then silence. Richard opened his eyes, seeing his hand hanging limply, and then the pain struck him. He screamed in agony and sat on the soft, thick grass. Tears ran down his cheeks as he sat there, sobbing and holding his wrist. Simeon knew it was now time for action. “William, quick, help me lift him.”William was still rolling around and quite giddy. Thinking, ‘Are you kidding, Sim, I can hardly stand up, and this big brute will have another go at me!’“Quickly, William! Grab his arm, and let’s find his parents.”William begrudgingly pulled himself up and staggered towards Richard but tripped and fell on him. Richard screamed again in agony. “Oops. Sorry, Richard!” William exclaimed. Richard howled.Under Simeon’s instruction, they both took one of Richard’s arms and lifted him onto his feet as best they could. The three were lopsided, as William was slightly shorter than his brother. They staggered towards the front of the church and approached the mayor’s wife. Marjorie Smith noticed her son in agony, and she immediately rushed over and consoled him. “Thank you, Simeon and William. Whatever happened, Richard? Oh, poor little fellow!”Simeon was careful with his words and produced a brief explanation.  “We were playing hide and seek in the graveyard when Richard came out from behind a gravestone, and William ran into him. As Richard fell, he put out his hand and struck it on the gravestone.”“Oh, poor little Dear – we must find Doctor Stephens and have him look at you. It's probably a sprain. Quick now, Simeon, please tell Mayor Smith that I need him. That would be so helpful. And William looks like he is hurt as well.”“It’s nothing, Mrs Smith – just a slight knock. He will be fine.” William grinned at her gingerly with more of a grimace than a smile. However, Marjorie Smith now lost her focus on William and attended to her howling son.Simeon dutifully collected the mayor, and the Smith family set off with Doctor Stephens towards his surgery.   The Reverend Andrew Taggart watched the complete discussion between Mrs Smith and Simeon Turner with some trepidation. Jonathan Turner became suspicious when he saw the look on Andrew’s face but felt more pressing matters were at hand.Anne and Marion Steele, standing beside Simeon and William, chatted and became acquainted. Anne mouthed at Simeon, “I don’t want to know!”Sim tried hard to cultivate a concerned expression for Richard and William but could not contain a slight smile. Observing this as he completed his discussions, Jonathan Turner decided it was time for the family to return home for lunch.Approaching Miss Steele, Mr Turner said, “I understand you will join Thomas and Anne for a walk to the river this afternoon. The weather looks fine, so I am sure you will have a lovely time. Please take care as the riverbank can be rather steep. I hope we shall see more of you, Miss Steele.” Having grown fond of Thomas and Anne far quicker than expected, Marion replied, “Thank you, Mr Turner. That is kind of you, and I will heed your advice.”Anne lifted her eyebrows and thought that the morning events were taking a turn for the better. She wondered what might develop from this.The Turners and the McPhersons were among the last families leaving the church. Simeon Turner gave Reverend Taggart a confident wave acknowledging everything was fine. Reverend Taggart waved back with a smile and then wiped his brow with a handkerchief. He turned and escorted Mrs Taggart into the Rectory for luncheon. At lunch, Jonathan Turner wondered what happened at church to cause Richard’s injury. The mayor’s son was a fine specimen of a boy, and Jonathan doubted that Richard’s injury resulted from a game of ‘hide and seek’. He focused his enquiries on Sim.“Simeon, how exactly did Richard injure his wrist?”“Just as I told Mrs Smith, Father. He bashed it at an awkward angle on a gravestone. I have never seen anything like it before. He shuts his eyes when he throws his arms around. I heard the bone crack as he did it. It was a bit sickening.”Jonathan Turner considered this for a while and said, “It must have been a freak accident – how unlucky! Was it broken?”“I’m not sure, Father, but I would say it probably was by the sound of the crack we heard!”William could not contain himself and let out a little laugh. Dismayed by William’s laugh, Jonathan said, “It is not a laughing matter, William, and your eye socket is turning blue. It looks like someone gave you a good bruiser! Have you an explanation?”Simeon quickly answered, “Richard’s elbow knocked William in the eye quite hard as he fell.”“Is that what happened, William?”“Yes, Father!”“I also heard that Caleb Steele knocked his front teeth out at school on Friday. Did you boys hear anything about this?”Simeon sensed this question was more of an interrogation than a mere passing comment. He felt danger. William quickly said, “We were in class then, but Reverend Taggart told us what happened.”Eleanora broke into the conversation before Jonathan could dig any further. “You boys should take more care when you play around the back of the church. I was pleased that Anne and Thomas had acquainted Miss Marion Steele, and she will attend the river walk this afternoon. I, too, need a walk in the cool beside the river, Jonathan. If I wore a veil, that would sufficiently cover my bruising.”   Simeon and William looked at each other in relief. They knew their father suspected foul play, but their mother had cleverly diverted him. “I’m not sure that is wise, my Dear, as it is still Sunday, and we explained at church that you would not receive visitors until next Friday.”“Jonathan, I will not receive visitors; I’m regaining strength on a sunny afternoon walk. I will cover up, and as usual, all the families we know will probably be up at the castle grounds where the band is playing today. We will not be disturbed at the river, and I will cover my face and body. I would enjoy a walk in the sun with the children and a rest down by the river.”Jonathan was terrified but held his voice. He had no choice and must agree. “I shall join you then, Ma’am. Mrs Jennings? Would you, please, pack a basket of biscuits, some rolls and a rug. We can make a little picnic afternoon feast.”“Splendid Jonathan, what a wonderful idea. Off you go, girls and boys! Run upstairs and put on your play clothes.”The boys and Marcia needed no more encouragement and were gone in a second; the other girls finished their lunch and quietly went upstairs. Eleanora then spoke softly. “Jonathan, the opportunity for Thomas with Miss Steele may be fortunate. Anne tells me she has a sweet personality and is quite pleased with Thomas. He is of marriageable age. From what Anne tells me, she would be a good match.”Jonathan enjoyed a conversation with his wife again on a subject other than the incident. He quickly replied, “It took me by surprise – I was talking with Mr McPherson, and he introduced his niece. She is charming. However, I am not sure why she would prefer our family. Surely, coming from London, there must be a finer catch there. If a match eventuates, it will be a good alliance for the family. Eleanora, are you sure about this walk?”“Yes, Jonathan, I have been shut up all week and would welcome some fresh air. I will be very gentle with myself and enjoy walking with you.”Jonathan was quite pleased with this comment, and it lessened his fear of a chance meeting with friends. The Picnic Beside the River Wey, Guildford … At the time appointed, Thomas and Anne set out for the Black Moon Inn with high hopes for their new friend. The afternoon became quite warm, requiring light clothing. Eleanora worked hard on disguising her bruising with a full-length sleeved dress, hat and veil. She felt more alive today than in a week and eagerly awaited watching her children play beside the river.  As they set out, Jonathan took her arm and waited attentively on her. He was concerned about any contact with other friends and neighbours. While Eleanora enjoyed the walk in the warm sunshine, the experience outdoors would also emphasise to Jonathan that he must fulfil his promise about change. She noticed how rigidly he walked, which must be from his stress over the situation. William loved these excursions where the family played games beside the river. He ran ahead, full of energy and excitement, leaving everything behind until he reached the riverbank first.  They found a pleasant spot where the bank was mainly gently sloping, covered in deep green grass and, in some places, little grassed mounds and trees on each side of the river. The calm brown water drifted past slowly and moved the branches of the weeping willows so they looked like ghosts walking on water. William found a stick and waved it madly, scattering the ducks and swans away from the riverbank. His imagination took him into the pirate world, where adventure reigned supreme. He jumped onto a mound near the water’s edge and imagined himself on his ship’s quarter deck. Soon, commands could be heard as he issued orders to the crew. “Hoist the sails me, lads, and cast off. There be a treasure for the taking!” Turning, he found himself facing Simeon, who also held a stick. “Surrender, Captain of the pirates! I, Captain Turner, arrest you in the name of the King. Yield and stand down.” “Never!” cried William, “We will fight to the death!”“Then prepare pirate captain for the hereafter. My crew will take your ship!”Clementine and Marcia soon joined Simeon’s crew, ready for the boarding. Clementine yelled, “Aye, Aye, Captain,” Marcia gave little shrills of excitement as she ran back and forth, and Maddie jumped in, joining pirate Captain Will. The two boys started jousting, and the imaginary pirate swords struck and waved as the boys danced around the mound. As Anne, Thomas and Marion Steele approached the riverbank, they laughed as they saw the small boys and girls battling with sticks. “It is the age they are at, Marion. Pirates are a great romance in their lives now. We have a lot of fun as a family this way. I hope you don’t mind?” Thomas was concerned that she was comfortable with this informal behaviour.  “Thomas, I am honoured and privileged by your family’s hospitality. I have three elder brothers at home, and I can see myself some years ago doing just as Marcia is. She is so cute. Let us join in!”“Aye, Aye, Captain,” Anne yelled, and the two girls were off in a run, joining the melee.Thomas stood there with his mouth open. He was amazed that this polished young lady from the city would run and join in with these childish antics. Perhaps, he thought, he was taking himself too seriously. An excellent old pirate battle would be fun, especially with Marion. He launched himself into the yelling frenzy on the quarter deck. Any bystander would have been confused by the running and yelling of this small swarm of young folk. But these free spirits knew precisely what they were doing. The difficulties of this world disappeared for a time, and they revelled in the energy of youth under a warm summer sun. Jonathan and Eleanora, nearing the riverbank, stopped in amazement, seeing Thomas fencing with Marion, obviously as an opponent, laughing and giggling as the others wrestled and ran around them. “I haven’t seen Thomas enjoying himself so much in ages, Jonathan. They do make a good match, don’t they?”“I’m not sure what Mr and Mrs McPherson would think if they saw this!” Jonathan shuddered at the thought. His striking a deal with Hamish McPherson could be a clincher for a much larger business in Guildford. It would also possibly involve Richard in Ewell with a new pub. He was keen that these possibilities were not spoilt. “I think I might just calm them down a bit.”Eleanora smiled as Jonathan walked towards the pirate brawl on the bank. As the numbers increased on the poop deck, William, leading the pirates, broke his first sword and now held a fallen thick tree branch as a landing hook. He twirled the weapon around at anyone he could. As Jonathan approached for a word with William, the young boy missed seeing his father nearby. As Jonathan came into range, William, unawares and facing the other direction, took a mighty swing at Sim, the King’s man, and missed. The momentum of his large branch twirled him around, striking Jonathan a beauty right across the forehead. When Jonathan regained consciousness, he found himself lying on the ground peacefully with his head in his wife’s lap. She looked down at him with a gentle smile and delicately wiped his face with a wet cloth. Jonathan smiled back, thinking, ‘This was nice!’ Until the pain started. Suddenly, he remembered what happened. His body went rigid. He wrestled with sitting up, but Eleanora held him back. She whispered in his ear, “Let it go, Jonathan – it was an accident. Let it go!”Jonathan stopped and realised, ‘That wretched William belted me one!’Eleanora could see the rage growing. “Jonathan, listen, please! The children and Marion are most concerned for you. There is much going on here, Jonathan. Remember Thomas and Marion. Do not spoil this, Jonathan. Please relax.”Jonathan Turner was not in the mood to listen, but for Eleanora, he complied. He would prefer thrashing William, as the boy was too volatile. Perhaps the events at the church school involved William. Perhaps not. If his suspicions were correct, then he would lose business for sure. But the deal with the McPhersons was more critical. Marion’s goodwill could be a significant influence. His wife was right; he must control his temper.Jonathan laid his head back on his wife’s lap and closed his eyes. He relaxed and said, “More, please.”Eleanora smiled, “Now, that’s the boy.” She wiped his face again softly.William slowly came near his father and knelt beside him. “I’m sorry, Father! It was an accident.”Jonathan said back, “Thank you, William.” He opened his eyes, seeing William kneeling close and a shadowy figure behind his head. He shut his eyes and opened them again, this time achieving a better focus - Hamish McPherson was grinning at him from behind William’s shoulder. “My, he clocked you a beauty, Jonathan. I have not seen such entertainment since my children were young. Ha, Ha. You were out for a while, but Eleanora was very calm and told us how tough you were and that you would be conscious soon. A fine wife, you have, Sir.”Jonathan lay there with his mouth open. Hamish laughed. “Eleanora told us a bit about the children while you rested. I must also say these biscuits are delicious. We need them in my hotels, Jonathan. We can discuss this tomorrow at our meeting before you leave for London. Just take it easy – I must re-join the pirate game!”Hamish saluted with a stick and rushed off after William, shouting pirate-type commands. Eleanora wiped Jonathan’s face and smiled, saying, “Such a nice man!” Jonathan closed his eyes again and let the rage leave his body. The sun was warm. The tension was gone. Anne, Marion, and Thomas laughed about the day as they walked home up the High Street. Anne was keen to know more about this new friend from Greenwich. “Marion. Do you have brothers and sisters at home in Woolwich?” Anne was curious about Miss Steele’s family and why she would visit with her uncle rather than her mother and father. Marion looked down and swallowed deeply. Blushing, she struggled with her words.  Anne immediately felt worried. Marion was upset by the question. But then Marion spoke up before Anne could apologise.“It is difficult discussing my family at this time. We are going through some deeply personal issues.” Anne spoke forthrightly, “I am sorry, Marion. Pray, forgive me if I caused you any sorrow.”Marion slowly looked up. Anne could see the moisture in her eyes – as tears appeared. “No, no …it does not cause me sorrow – it has been so wonderful being included in your family fun today. I have felt more alive today than I have been for months.”Her sentiment touched Thomas, and he handed her a handkerchief, noticing her tears. “Please, Marion, do not let us press you.” “No, Thomas, I must explain. My mother is unwell. Father has placed her in a hospital for her care, and we visit often. She has lost her memory. One day, she knows us, then the next, there is nothing!I have three brothers who work with my father in the cannon casting business. They make cannon shafts for the army. My brothers and father have disagreed over my mother entering care. My brothers want her home; however, my father feels that she is at a stage now where we cannot meet her care needs. I love my family dearly and hate this disagreement destroying our happiness. Mrs McPherson is my mother’s sister. Mr McPherson and Auntie Marjorie have been such a tremendous help. They are such kind people. You would never know it of Mr McPherson as he is a tough businessman and has made a fortune. They have taken me under their wing. Mrs McPherson has replaced my mother over the last year, and I cannot thank them enough for their generosity. Our family is like yours. We are tradespeople who have done well. That is why it was so much fun being with you today. Being part of some family fun again was so good!”Thomas felt sympathy for her situation but found himself wordless. Anne was impressed that Marion would be so open. She felt a close bond growing with this girl. “Marion, while you are here in Guildford, please spend as much time with us as you wish. Perhaps we could have tea tomorrow afternoon – you will not see much of Thomas for the rest of the week, as he will be running the bakery while Father is away, and Thomas rises early in the morning – about three. I, too, work at the bakery for a few hours in the morning, but I am free in the afternoons. Perhaps you and Mrs McPherson would join us for afternoon tea?”Marion wiped the tears from her eyes, “I would like nothing more!”The two girls took each other’s hands and hugged. Then, each taking one of Thomas’ arms, they strolled up the High Street, letting the warm summer afternoon soak into this growing friendship. 

Turner's Rage: Chapter Three
Turner's Rage: Chapter Three

23 March 2024, 10:00 PM

Turner's Rage: List of CharactersClick here to check the list of charactersChapter 3The Turner Bakery, Guilford …Jeb Hiscock and Thomas Turner stood at the front of the Turner bakery, looking towards the new mill almost complete beside the River Wey. Jeb understood how well-placed Guilford was on the canal for purchasing flour from the various local mills. Given this proximity, he was undecided if this mill was needed.  “Thomas, why is your father building such a large mill?”“You remember the Albion Flour Mills near Blackfriars Bridge in London?”“No, never heard of it. Never been to London!”“Yes, it was a bit before our time. It was the first steam-powered flour mill in England. There was an uprising against it because of its high productivity and excellent flour quality. Put all the other mills in London out of business. There were suggestions that the out-of-work mill workers were responsible for the fire that destroyed it in 1791.” Thomas lifted his eyebrows.   “You mean the workers burnt it down?”“The investigation found no evidence backing the suspicions. But all the closed mills reopened and employed their staff again as soon as the Albion mill was gone.”“Well, should we expect that to happen here?”“It’s been thirty-five years since that occurred, and steam engines have become far more refined. All the components are now made of iron and last far longer. Others are now experimenting with the concept, so if we ignore steam power, we may lose any advantage we presently have here in Guildford. Yes, it will eventually put the other mills out of business, but not straight away. We intend a gradual introduction, so there is no uprising here. But it will mean that we produce flour at half the cost we currently pay.”“I see!”“Jeb, we should know by October if it works. Do not worry; your job is safe. If anything, your role will become more important as our demand for grain will grow.”Jeb was amazed at all the other innovations Jonathan Turner was implementing and the amount of change happening. “I’m glad I work here, Thomas. The new ovens your father is installing are amazing. They are far better than the old earthen ones, and the three levels allow far more products to be baked daily. I wonder what he will come up with next.”“Not sure, Jeb, but we can discuss those new biscuits we produce while you have a minute. Let’s go down and look at that oven. They will be in high demand, and we may need a production line. Have you got time now? We should discuss the design.”“Let me pick up the orders from the office first, and then we can start.”Meeting at the back of the bakery, they spent an hour discussing a reorganisation for higher output.Later in the morning, Jeb ensured the last of the day’s production was off on carts from the dispatch area, then made his way into the office area where Anne was working. The business was expanding, and Jeb always checked the next day’s orders before starting tomorrow’s preparations. The paperwork was becoming central to the business operations. One of the benefits of visiting the office for Jeb was spending time with Anne. He found her the most pleasant and sensible of all the girls in town. She respected him as an equal and always gave helpful suggestions – he was amazed at how smart she was for a girl! Jeb was a man of perception and realised that Anne’s role was growing in importance in the Turner businesses. He was careful in how he managed this relationship. As Jeb entered the office, he noticed Mr Turner was not in, and most of the staff were in the counting room concentrating on the banking.  “Good morning, Anne. I have come for the dispatches and orders. Would you pass them over, please?”Anne did not reply but sat there, pen in hand, looking out the window towards the river. “Miss Anne?”Suddenly seeing Jeb there, she realised he must have said something, “Jeb, sorry, I was thinking of my mother; she is so unwell!”Jeb saw the look of concern on her face and was troubled. “I thought something must be wrong – how is your mother?”“Not well at all – I have never seen her so low. Father and the doctor are with her now. I will need to spend more time at home looking after her.”“I’m sorry! I was not aware that she was that sick. Will she recover?”“Thank you for your concern – yes – in time and given good care. Clementine and I will ensure she receives that. If you would excuse me, this letter for Bethany is quite urgent. I must advise her that mother is unwell.”Jeb was disturbed that Anne would be away more in the future. He was eager not to waste this opportunity.  “I hope your mother recovers soon, as I enjoy our conversations. I would miss talking with you, Miss Anne.”“Jeb ….I enjoy talking with you too, but I must help my mother. There will be plenty of time ahead for discussion. I will still be working here. I’m glad you enjoy our conversations.”Jeb was embarrassed. He blushed slightly and looked down at his feet. He was not as well educated as Anne and lacked the gift of easy conversation. “Will you be at Church on Sunday?”“Why Jeb – anyone would think you were seeking opportunities for us to meet. You best not let my father know about this – he may not understand. But yes, I will be at church and shall see you there!” She smiled at him and then continued her writing. Jeb was pleased knowing that Anne thought well of him. Her kind words were a step forward - she was not against their acquaintance growing, giving him some hope. He remembered the documents were still not checked. “Miss Anne. Would you pass me those documents, please?”“What documents, Jeb?”“The dispatch notices for today and the orders for tomorrow. Thank you.”At the Turner Household … Jonathan Turner entered the kitchen and glared at the head chimney sweeper, Jack Slope. “What’s this about, Sweep? We set the terms at the bakery, and I want no more of this disturbing my household with your loud arguments.”“Ah, Mr Turner, it’s just that these chimneys are far smaller than at the bakery, around 9 inches by 12 inches, and it will be difficult for my boys without getting stuck. They must strip right off and move very carefully and slowly. I paid dearly for them, so I want ’em surviving! The bakery has far wider chimneys, 12 inches by 14 inches, allowing ample room. I will need an extra shilling here per chimney. That is five shillings for the five chimneys, Sir.”“You’re a thief, Slope, but you’re right. The chimneys are narrower, but not by that much! Three shillings for the five chimneys, and now get on with it.” “Thank you, Sir – we can do the job for that!”With the issue settled and breakfast finished, Jonathan Turner left for the bakery. It was a freezing morning for July, but now, the clouds glided with the southerly wind to the north, and the mid-summer temperature was rising. He enjoyed a quick moment of warm sunlight as he walked down the familiar path towards the bakery, unaware of the beauty around him.Jonathan could not shift his focus from the issues with William. After hearing the advice Anne gave William, he was sure the boy would remain quiet. Recalling the work still waiting for him today, Jonathan took a deep breath and picked up his pace. Meeting with the builders of the new mill was now a priority before leaving on his Ewell and London trip. The next few months should be problem-free and the weather fine. Also, Thomas and Jeb must brief him on the production and store situation. He would determine which customers they needed to visit, ensuring their orders grew. Overcome by his business demands, Jonathan soon lost his focus on the home situation.William saw his father striding down the street towards the bakery from a hallway window. He let out a sigh of relief. The coast was clear for venturing downstairs and watching the chimney sweeps. He threw off the blanket, jolted down the four stairs, and burst into the kitchen. Mrs Jennings turned and frowned but said nothing. William immediately saw the Master Chimney Sweep, Mr Jack Slope, a thin and dirty-looking man, peering up the chimney on his knees in the fireplace. He had a long stick and poked it around the inside of the chimney. Standing in the kitchen corner were three children, all about William’s age but shorter in height. Slope shouted at the children, “Stay here while I check the other chimneys! Don’t you move or touch anything, or there will be trouble! You see? You see?” The children dutifully answered, “Yes, Mr Slope.”“That’s better. Now, Mrs Jennings, would you please show me the other chimneys?”Mrs Jennings breathed deeply and led Jack Slope into the hallway and across to the drawing room, saying, “Tell me when you are doing Mrs Turner’s room as I must be present.”William noticed that the children were small and thin. One of them was a girl. Their clothes were black with soot, and their faces were grey as if they were dry wiped. They stood quite still with no interest in anything except the fireplace, which was out and cooling. William approached the girl and asked her name. She gazed up at him and then said her name was Olivia. There was no life in her voice, just a kind of croaking. He noticed that she was a good six inches shorter than him. Her hair was black and cut short and smelt foul. He took a step backwards.“How old are you, Olivia?”“Who’s asking?” said one of the other boys, looking William up and down. “Sorry!”Olivia very quietly murmured out of the side of her mouth, “I’m five – I think!”The boy who spoke previously turned and cracked her across the face. “Don’t you talk, or you’ll get us all belted by Jack!” He then turned and glared at William, warning him off. William moved away. He noticed white streaks running down Olivia’s cheeks and felt guilty for causing her trouble.Suddenly, Jack Slope was back with Mrs Jennings. “Right, Reuben, up this one as it is a bit bigger than the others and clean it out. Olivia and Tom with me! The drawing room is next.” William watched as the boy who warned him off quickly put a mat over the fireplace, put on his cap and, holding his brush above his head, promptly scaled up the chimney and out of sight. A steady flow of soot started coming down the chimney onto the mat covering the hearth. Seeing that this chimney sweeper was out of sight, he followed the others into the drawing room. Not noticing William at the rear near the doorway, Jack talked sternly with Olivia. “You’re the only one who can get up this chimney. So up you go, my girl.”The fireplace in the drawing room seemed a reasonable size, but when William looked hard, he could see that Jack Slope was right. The chimney vent was much smaller than the one in the kitchen. Olivia was peering up the chimney but hesitating. The head Chimney Sweep could see she was afraid. He quietly demanded her, “Get up that chimney, or I’ll push you up there, you little brat.”She began whimpering, saying it was too narrow. Jack Slope grabbed her and pushed her head and shoulders up the chimney. She stood there, shaking. “Tom! Light the fire.” William felt a chill over his body as he imagined being up that chimney. He was horrified as Tom lit the fire with Olivia’s feet still in the fireplace.Tom edged back past Jack Slope. Sparks surrounded the girl’s feet, and she screamed and quickly moved up the chimney. Tom covered the fire and put it out. As in the kitchen, a flow of soot fell onto the mat that now covered the fireplace. “Stupid little brat, she should have finished by now!”The soot flow continued for a minute or two and then stopped. Jack Slope cautiously looked up the chimney but could see nothing as it was pitch black. He knew there was no bend in the flue, so either Olivia was refusing, or she was stuck. He called up the chimney, “Olivia, get to work! No soot is coming down. Get a move on, girl! What’s holding you up?” There was no reply. Reuben came into the room and stood beside Jack. “Ah, good boy! Tom, you keep calling Olivia and get her going. If she don’t answer, light the fire again, that’ll get her going. Reuben, come with me upstairs.”Jack Slope left the room, and Tom moved towards the fire. Horrified, William said, “Hey, don’t light that. Olivia’s up there!”.Tom shrugged and yelled up the chimney, “Olivia - what’s happening up there? Are you stuck or something? Olivia, what’s happening?”There was no answer.Jack came back into the room and confronted Tom. He belted him twice around the head. “Why ain’t that fire going? We gotta get her moving!”He removed the mat and lit the fire, which crackled into life but subsided as no draft was in the chimney. It appeared solidly blocked as a small cloud of smoke filled the room. Slope quickly opened a window, hoping the smoke would clear. He was becoming worried - this was all taking too long – he needed Olivia finished and in the next chimney.“Tom, up you go and put pins in her feet. “Tom reluctantly moved onto the fireplace, which was still partially alight. He squeezed into the narrow chimney. Being a slightly larger boy than Reuben or Olivia, he was not more than three feet up the chimney before he became stuck. His feet were still showing in the fireplace. Jack Slope belted the boy’s feet until they bled in a final effort at moving Tom. William watched this whole episode with horror, imagining Olivia’s plight. Tom cried out that he was stuck. Slope pulled Tom down and belted him again. The young lad hid his face in his arms as he suffered his master’s anger. Mrs Jennings entered the room and, seeing the mess, hurled abuse at Slope with no mercy. Soot was all over the parlour floor, walked in by the chimney sweeps in their chaos to solve the situation. The smoke continued building up in the room, adding to the melee.Slope gestured at the chimney and said, “One of me chimney sweeps is stuck up there - it is a very narrow chimney and….” His voice trailed off as the smoke thickened. “Stop that fire, Tom!”There was still no response from Olivia. William moved slowly back towards the hallway door – he stood behind a chair and watched the panic unfolding in the room. He thought in terror about the little girl. Was she stuck in the chimney? How would they get her out? William heard Mrs Jennings calling Clementine. “Quick, get your father from the Bakery – we need the builders! A chimney sweep is stuck.” William panicked – he knew calling his father home a second time would be a disaster. There would be fireworks; he must remain hidden in case of repercussions. William backed out of the room, through the kitchen, along the hall and up the stairs. He would have a good view from the top step of what was happening when the builders came.   It was early afternoon before Jonathan Turner arrived. The Master Chimney Sweep was out of ideas, and there was still no response from the girl. Jonathan Turner was infuriated as this was the second time his work arrangements had been disturbed today; he was running out of time before his trip. Although he knew he had started the mess, the day was becoming a disaster. A pink shade formed on his brow as the rage inside him verged on erupting.“What has happened, Slope?”“Ah! It seems one of my Sweeps has become stuck in your chimney, Mr Turner, and we can’t get her down.”“Her? You told me you had boys!”“Yes, the girl was the right size for the chimney, and we sent her up.”“Why use a girl? She would not be strong enough!”Jack Slope shrugged his shoulders and looked away. Jonathan Turner got down on his knees and peered up the chimney. It was pitch black – he usually could see the light at the top. “It appears your chimney sweep has completely blocked the flue. There may be a large amount of soot around her. What are you doing to rescue her?”Jonathan didn’t wait for an answer. He knew time was critical. “Where are the builders? Clementine. Find Clementine and see where the builders are. Damn you, Slope. Now, I must take apart my chimney! I doubt the chimney sweep girl will survive this.”Slope grunted, “It ain’t no matter, Mr Turner, they are queuing up from the poor house for indentures. They are cheap, and plenty of em!” Recalling his wife’s suffering from his treatment and the guilt he now blocked out caused his reflection on the fragility of life during the day. He was thankful that his wife was recovering and for his daughters, who now looked after her. This little chimney sweep was someone’s daughter – a child who either was orphaned or sold into an indenture for a life of misery. He was startled by Slope’s complete ignorance of the value of human life. He stared at him as his inner trembling took over his self-control. The rage that was growing erupted. He lost perception and could focus only on this man who treated human life with disdain.Jonathan grabbed the scruff of his neck and dragged him through the house, across the rear veranda, and into the backyard. Slope’s protests had no effect. In the backyard, out of sight of the neighbours, his rage, which grew in intensity, overcame him. He threw Slope on the ground with one foot on either side of the sweep. Jonathan was a well-built, medium-height man, strong from a life of manual labour. With fists of iron clenched and the strength of an ox, Jonathan glared down at this protesting, ignorant fellow. His rage drove him – he lost perspective; his anger took over, and the world around him disappeared as he punished this sinner. The belting was savage. He stood above Jack Slope’s chest and yelled down at him, “You sent a little girl up my chimney. God damn you, man! Have you no sense?” The Chimney Sweep was beyond answering.If it were not for Doctor Jeremy Stephens arriving in the next few moments, Jonathan might have beaten the man senseless. Jeremy Stephens stopped him. “Jonathan. Jonathan stop. Stop, Jonathan!”Suddenly aware of his surroundings, Jonathan Turner stopped and noticed Jeremy’s presence. It was as if he was surfacing from a deep dive in the ocean. He took a great breath.“There is a chimney sweep stuck in my drawing room chimney. A little girl! This idiot sent a little girl up the chimney to clean it!”Jeremy put his arm around Jonathan’s shoulders and led him away. “Some chimney sweeps use girls now, as they are smaller and can scale the smaller chimney vents. But I agree they would not have the strength of a boy.”Jonathan’s fist started relaxing and unclenched. His perception returned, and he realised he was in the back garden. He glanced over his shoulder.Jack Slope lay groaning on the ground. His face was a bloodied mess. He cringed as he saw Turner looking at him. Soon, the builders arrived with Jeb, who pointed out the critical chimney. Thomas and Anne joined the growing crowd of concerned onlookers.  Jeremy sat Jonathan down, requesting a cup of water. Sipping the water, Jonathan now appeared under control. Jeremy then attended Slope. The chimney sweep would not work again that day.Mr Robinson, the head builder, asked Jeb, “Have you got a long rope, Jeb?”Jeb nodded, darted off to the garden shed, grabbed a rope, and returned to the builder in a minute. “Climb up on the roof and drop the rope down the chimney until it reaches the girl. Before taking out the bricks, we must find out how far down she is.” Jeb darted back into the back shed and tied a weight onto the rope’s end. He also took a ladder and scaled the roof at the back of the house. Carefully traversing the roof ridges, he reached the drawing-room chimney. There was a large crowd of bystanders on the footpath by this time.Jeb could see pitch dark about ten feet down as he peered down the chimney. He dropped the rope until it stopped, further down than the darkness indicated. Quickly knotting the rope, he pulled it out and lowered it down the outside of the chimney by the same length. Robinson and his men rapidly positioned ladders, climbed up and slowly started removing the bricks, shoring up the chimney and avoiding any possibility of a collapse. It took about half an hour before the hole was large enough to extract the chimney sweep. Robinson lifted the limp little body out. Gently carrying her down, he placed Olivia on the ground on some linen Anne thoughtfully brought from the house. Robinson’s eyes filled with tears as he put the lifeless, warm body on the sheet. Jeremy Stephens examined her and found no pulse. Her eyes were open, with a look of horror on her face. He checked her mouth, which was full of soot. The falling mass encasing her resulted in suffocation. The sight sadly moved the Doctor as he noticed each of the soles of Olivia’s feet showed signs of burns. William crept down from his bedroom and, peeping out the drawing-room window, saw the helpless body on the linen sheet. He was horrified at what he saw and the events of that afternoon. Tears rushed down his cheeks. “Olivia!” he thought.Jeremy Stephens knelt and gently closed the dead girl’s eyes. “Sleep peacefully, little one. You are safe now. God will keep you in his care.”Standing, he shared with the group around the body, “It’s a real pity, but I often see it. It will be called accidental death. Nothing you could have done, Jonathan. Do we know where her family is?”Jonathan Turner, overcome by emotion, could not speak. Regaining his thoughts, `There should be a law against idiots like Jack Slope. There must be a better way than this.’ Jeb was standing beside the girl’s body. He looked up at Doctor Stephens. Quietly, in his deep voice, he said, “I know her family – Stepton! Her father was a labourer up at Batton Place until he became sick. They have a cottage on the estate, but they let go some of the children. Couldn’t afford to keep them! Mark Stepton and his wife, Alison.”   Thomas moved up beside his father. “Mother must be disturbed by all this noise. It would be best if you were with her. I will take care of this accident now. Constable Rawlings has been informed and will be here soon. We shall discuss it all at dinner.”Jonathan Turner looked at Thomas and felt some relief. His first-born son was becoming a good manager, a person he was proud of, “Thank you, Thomas. I will visit your mother directly. No, no. Jeremy, you go first and complete your check on her. Ah, Thomas, this little one shall have a good funeral, poor thing. Someone must tell her family what has happened. It is a sad business.”Jeb moved closer. “Mr Turner, if I may please, may I tell them? There will be others in the community who will want to know, as well as my family. My mother will come and comfort Mrs Stepton.”“Yes. Yes, Jeb, good fellow. Thank you, and take one of the bakery carts, please. Tell them we will arrange the return home of the body as soon as the Constable finishes. Please tell Mr Stepton that we will pay for all the funeral costs and attend. Thomas will make the arrangements. And Jeb, would you call at the Manor House and advise Squire Easton of what has happened.”Thomas quietly said, “Father, you know the Eastons are recusant¹. Is this wise?”¹ In  the early 1800s dealing with Roman Catholics was socially unacceptable until the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829 which removed most of the barriers for catholic emancipation. Even so the stigma remained and was slow to change.“No time for these views now, Thomas – we have no quarrel with them!”Jonathan stared at the dead child for a further few minutes. He knew well the desperation from poverty that many parents faced. Without an income and many mouths to feed, they would sell their children into an indenture with the chimney sweeps. Jonathan Turner was a tough businessman, but he also had empathy for the people around him. A family losing a child was a tragedy, but it should not be allowed in such circumstances as this. He muttered that he would never see his children in such a state. There must be a better way – he knew a man using a mechanical sweep. He must find him and never let this happen again. He turned and went into the house.  Sleep for William that night did not come easily. Visions of Olivia’s body being taken away on a cart kept flashing in his mind. He continually imagined soot filling his mouth, and his body wedged up a chimney with a fire coming from underneath. What Reverend Taggart said about hell was true. Chimney sweeping was like visiting hell. The room was pitch dark and cold. William feared the dark. He could hear Thomas and Simeon softly breathing as they slept. Getting out of bed, he knelt beside Simeon’s bed and shook him. There was no response. William shook him again. Simeon opened one eye.“What?” he said. Thomas rolled over in his sleep. William froze until the soft breathing started again. He very quietly said,“I’m scared of death!” Simeon looked at him and grunted, “You won’t be scared for long if you don’t stop shaking me!”William whimpered, “I’m cold!”Simeon sighed and rolled over in his bed. William slid in and put his back against his brother. He was quickly asleep, feeling warm and safe.   The Church School, Guildford …At Reverend Andrew Taggart’s church school, the next day, the big topic of conversation amongst the children was the death of the chimney sweep at the Turner’s house. Reverend Taggart could see that the children needed an understanding of the events. He explained that as chimneys filled with soot, they must be cleaned. A consequence of not cleaning chimney flues was house fires – William shuddered at the thought of family members burning. This description was a new thought of terror for William – yes, chimneys must fill up with soot, so that is why they needed cleaning. But why would parents let their children become chimney sweeps?The good Reverend explained that the Master Chimney Sweeps would find young children from the Poor House or low-income families, who would indenture their children as chimney sweeps. The money was essential for the family’s survival. He said that the chimney sweep who accidentally died was from the Poor House without relatives. William thought about this as Jeb said she was from a family at Batton Place.William opened his mouth but thought better of it and stayed quiet. She had a mother and father, but he was unsure about brothers and sisters. She was part of a family but sold into chimney sweeping. How could any family do this to a little girl? Then he thought about how his father often found fault with him. Would his father sell him to a Master Chimney Sweep? He shuddered. Olivia was dead. What would become of him? Reverend Taggart said that she was in heaven and safe with the Lord. William was not so sure!During lunch, Richard Smith and Caleb Elliot, five years older than William, suggested who cares anyway, as it was just a chimney sweep. They were the poorest and lowest parts of the community, and who cared? William felt slight anger rising in his heart. “They are dirty, grubby little moles and should be kept in the chimneys.” Caleb laughed.“Yes, up the chimneys and on fire!” They both laughed. William was incensed that these boys, older than himself, would be laughing about a little girl who was dead. William inherited two things from his father: a sense of justice and Jonathan’s rage. He took a deep breath and fronted Richard and Caleb. “Hey. Olivia was a nice girl and from a family. You shouldn’t laugh at her!”Caleb smirked and nudged Richard, “I think young Will here had feelings for little Olivia? Eh Will? You liked the smelly little brat!”The rage inside William was now heating up.Sitting close by with friends, Simeon saw the frown come over his brother’s face. He quietly kept an eye on William, standing near Richard and Caleb. Simeon knew how Will was deeply affected by the little girl’s death and bothered in his sleep last night.   Richard continued degrading the chimney sweeps, and the boys started baiting William. “Will loved Olivia! Ha, Ha Ha.” William clenched his fists, his rage boiling when Simeon grabbed him by the scruff of his neck and dragged him away. “Ignore it, Will. They are fools.”William could not ignore it but understood he must calm down so his brother would release his grip. Simeon felt William relaxing, “OK, then. You will leave them alone?” William nodded. Simeon let him go. “We can talk about this after school on the way home. Just stay away from them. “ Mrs Taggart rang the bell, calling the children into class. Some of the children started moving back into the church.William walked in the other direction, not saying a word. Unlike Jonathan Turner, William masked his rage far better than his father. He found an old axe handle without the head in the church shed near the vegetable garden. William smiled. Reinforcements!Richard and Caleb remained outside, sitting after all the other students were in class.Caleb laughed so hard he did not see Richard tumble off the seat. As he turned, he found Richard on the ground, shaking. The smile vanished from his lips as the axe handle crashed into his mouth, knocking out both front teeth with a gush of blood. Caleb went white for a moment, seeing stars. On that day, all three boys learnt some profound lessons. Fortunately, at six years old, William was without the strength to hurt Richard seriously, but Caleb’s injuries were severe. The Reverend Taggart, who found the boys, looked in disbelief at the screaming eleven-year-olds lying on the ground and the fierce six-year-old standing behind them with an axe handle in his hand. For Reverend Taggart, this was a first.  Being a man of peace, the Reverend knew that if the details of this incident reached the parents, three of his most worthwhile families might take punitive action. But what could be done? Rather than taking the axe handle off William, he asked politely, “William, return the axe handle to where it came from, please.” Best to keep William away from the scene altogether. Once he was satisfied, all the other children were in the classroom. Mrs Glossip was called and assisted Caleb. The Reverend Taggart saw a large bump on Richard’s head and checked if the lad was steady. Richard was unaware of what had happened, except for an immense pain in the back of the head. He slowly walked back into class, feeling a little giddy and rubbing the rear of his head. Caleb was also unsteady and could not remember what had happened. Reverend Taggart explained, “Somehow, Richard lost his footing and fell over. He must have bumped you, and you hit your head on the seat and out came your front teeth. We think that’s what happened, as nobody saw it. Hold that cloth against your mouth while we send for your mother.”Coming back from the shed, William was interested in why Reverend Taggart would tell Caleb this story of the events. Without being noticed, he took his seat in the class. The Reverend Taggart sent Caleb off with his mother, who was stuttering, “You stupid boy, now look what you’ve done”. Andrew Taggart thought this was working out well but then remembered William. Before he spoke with the boy, he must consult Simeon, who he believed might know how this all came about. This line of enquiry proved most helpful. When it was William’s turn, Reverend Taggart sat the nervous boy down and gave him a stern look. William said, “Please don’t tell my parents, Reverend Taggart. My father will beat me as he does, mother! He may even sell me to a chimney sweep!”The good Reverend was shocked when he heard these comments but quickly focused on the present situation.“Ah. And, so your father might if he finds out, young William. However, only Simeon knows what happened, and he tells me that someone provoked you. So, I think that we can make a pact.”William said, “What is a pact?”“It means that we both agree this will remain a secret and as long as it does, the pact remains in place.”William said, “I don’t understand.”“William, I encourage your good behaviour and hard work at school. This way, you will become a good reader and writer. I would most appreciate it if you would do this for me, and in return, we will not mention Caleb and Richard’s injuries. This way, you will not be beaten or sold as a chimney sweep! What do you say? Do we have a Pact?”William looked in amazement at the good Reverend. He was not expecting this. William gave a slight grin. He looked up thankfully at the Reverend Taggart. “I like you, Reverend Taggart. I agree to a pact!” This agreement gave reading and writing a new meaning for William. “Good boy William - now back into class and remember, no more of this.”The Reverend Taggart was astounded. This child of six, going on seven, displayed street smartness well beyond his years. He now wondered if his approach might be slightly misguided. However, he would not jeopardise the future of the school. Richard was the son of the mayor, who was a member of the parish council. Caleb’s father was the local blacksmith and a strong church supporter, and William’s father was a prominent businessman and the Chairman of the Parish Council. There was no need for disagreement between these men. Tonight, he would visit Richard and Caleb’s families, reinforce the story, and check the boys’ welfare. He might miss the Turner house - better left alone at this stage. ‘It is like being a politician being a clergyman. What was it that his wife said? Ah, yes! Just keep smiling, Andrew, keep smiling?’ It was now late morning, and Reverend Taggart already longed for his afternoon glass of sherry.             After school, William pestered Simeon about playing pirates by the river. While not opposed, Simeon said they should return home and invite the girls along as well. “Who knows, Mother may be recovered and wanting a walk!”  William agreed with this readily, as he missed seeing his mother. Having the girls there would be super for a pirate game. William began striding out for home, and Simeon scampered behind him. Bursting into the kitchen, William spied Clementine and asked if she, Anne, and her mother would enjoy a pirate game at the river. “I will come, but I’m unsure if Anne and Mother will agree. I would like a game of hide-and-seek, and mother needs some fresh air. How about you go and ask them?”William looked at Clementine with a question on his face. Having been banned from seeing his mother for the last two days, he questioned Clementine’s suggestion. Noticing the confusion on William’s face, Clementine smiled. “Go on then. They are in the drawing room!”William, finally understanding, just bolted. Simeon, entering the kitchen, said, “Me too?”Clementine smiled. “Yes – Go on!”William burst into the drawing room and saw his mother sitting with Marcia at her feet and Anne pouring tea. Eleanora looked up and smiled when she saw William.“How’s my big boy, William?” she said. Not waiting for any further invitation, William threw himself into his mother’s arms and buried his head against her chest. For William, his mother was the symbol of security and happiness. She was his confessor and his mentor. William found himself lost without her, and now they were together again. “Mother, please come and play pirates with us at the river today?”Eleanora hugged him tightly. She saw Simeon come into the room and beckoned him over – he, too, ran and hugged her. Anne moved the tea table back a bit, given these awkward males were disturbing the balance of the teacups. “Hey, Boys! William and Simeon, watch your feet. I have Mother’s tea here!”The boys sat either side of Marcia, who continued gabbling at everyone – she was excited that they were all together again. William quickly lifted a biscuit into his mouth and chomped it down. Anne gently kicked him, saying, “The biscuits are for Mother!”Eleanora looked at the children, glowing in her matronly pride. What a blessing these wonderful little people were. She contrasted the position she found herself in with a husband, whose carnal needs dictated his behaviour, and these beautiful children so full of life and attentiveness. “I’m not sure your father would like me outside yet. Doctor Stephens wants me inside for at least a week before I venture out, but this does not mean you children should stay inside. It is a perfect summer’s day for some fun, and I will be happy here with Mrs Jennings and this lovely afternoon tea that Anne made.”The children cheered for joy at the prospect of a pirate game at the riverbank. William stayed hugging his mother. “I thought you wanted a pirate game, William?”William released his grip on her and sat back down. Looking at her face, he noticed the bruises on her cheeks under the makeup. “Mother, I missed you so much. Why are you sick? Will it last long?”Eleanora flinched, remembering the beating she took from Jonathan. She also remembered seeing, out of the corner of her eye, a little head peering around the corner of her bedroom door. “I fell over William and hit my head – I will be better soon, and then I will be at the river with you.”William heard the excited talk in the kitchen with Clementine bawling out pirate commands as if she were Captain Blood, and much laughter followed. Seeing that they were alone and out of earshot, William took the opportunity.“I have bad dreams, Mother. I told Anne, and she said they would go away.”“What have you been dreaming, William?”“I dreamed I woke up at night, walked downstairs, and called you. But when I peeped into your bedroom, father was beating you. Father turned and saw me, so I ran back upstairs and hid. Anne said it was a nightmare and I should forget about it.”Eleanora could see that the child was asking for either confirmation of the story or acceptance that it was a nightmare. She was not sure she wanted the truth known, and she resisted placing her woes on this six-year-old boy. She was unsure whether to smile or cry – she became overwhelmed for a moment by her anxiety, and then she hugged him again.Holding him close she whispered, “It was just a nightmare, William. Your father loves me very much, and he would never hurt me. It was just a nightmare!”William stepped back and saw that tears ran down his mother’s cheeks. The makeup was running, and the bruises on her cheeks were obvious.Anne came in and stood beside William, gently nudging him.William held Anne’s hand, “I will think of it as a nightmare, Mother!”  In his mind, he understood what she wanted. She told him to disregard what he saw and believe something more fitting. William could not understand why she wanted this, but he would do this for her as he loved his mother more than anyone else. “Come on, Mr Pirate; Captain Blackbeard is waiting down at the river.” William continued looking at his mother as Anne led him out, holding his hand, which gripped hers tightly. Eleanora smiled at him as he left. She realised now that William was at the door on that terrible night and witnessed her beating. She shivered, knowing the terror it must have planted in the child. Yet William seemed to cope with her suggestion that it was a nightmare.That day, her intuition told her there was something different about William. As well as all his gifted abilities, he was a thinker. It was as if the child understood her predicament; his thinking seemed unrestricted by his age. He was still young and innocent, but this would not last long as he grew. Jonathan’s rage was present in him but different from his father’s. It appeared well under control, but would it stay that way? Some said that mothers sometimes had visions of their children’s future. Feeling a cold chill, she wrapped a shawl around her. In her dream, she saw him crossing vast oceans, far away and in danger. Then the skies cleared, and the sun came out over another land where he built a new life and his own family. Eleanora saw him with a swarm of children around him, his gentle hand quietly slipping out of her grip. She shuddered. The room was quiet – the children were gone.Her memory recalled that night. Jonathan must have seen the lad. What would he be thinking? Eleanora knew she must protect William. What had Anne and William shared? She must talk with Anne soon. Anne was aware of Jonathan’s beating her, but Anne was an adult and would maintain secrecy. With William, this would prove more difficult. She sighed and took a sip of warm tea.  

Turner's Rage: Chapter Two
Turner's Rage: Chapter Two

16 March 2024, 8:52 PM

Turner's Rage: List of CharactersKeep track of the characters here Chapter 2Jonathan and Thomas arrived at the house, finding the children at breakfast in the kitchen.“Thomas, please check with Anne on your mother’s condition while I take some breakfast!Ah, Marcia, what have you been doing here?”Marcia looked up with a beaming smile of joy, yelling, “Father, Father, look at this!” Jonathanwalked around the table and admired the coloured crayon lines exploding across the page.Madeline whispered, “It’s a pirate ship!”“Ah, perhaps it needs some blue for the sea down here?” Jonathan pointed, and Marciafound a blue crayon and started colouring urgently.Jonathan kissed Marcia on her forehead and gave her a little hug, which pleased herimmensely.Poking his head carefully around the door, William faced his father’s glaring eyes. An applefell out of William’s pocket as he took a step backwards in fright. Jonathan Turner was ofmedium height, about five feet eight inches, but with a strong build and thick dark brown hair.His muscular body gave him an imposing presence. He was a foreboding sight sitting there,straight-backed and with a sour expression.Now glaring into his son’s eyes, Jonathan was on the verge of beating the boy.‘If only William were the blessing Thomas was to the family!’ Then he recalled the boypeering into the bedroom last night and the actions he may have observed. Worried if hebeat the boy, it may all come out – he checked himself. For a man in Jonathan’s position insociety, he preferred his matrimonial details not to be discussed publicly. He decided on asofter approach.William slowly walked around the kitchen door, facing his father; he straightened his backand gritted his teeth, ready for a belting.“Where have you been, William? You know you have morning chores! Get about them, boy,before I strap you!” William’s eyes opened in horror, and he ran from the room. JonathanTurner smiled – he enjoyed handing out discipline. Better than that, he admired how quicklyWilliam reacted – the boy was quick – it reminded him of himself. His temper subsidedslightly, with breakfast now becoming his focus.William rushed up the stairs and ran straight into Anne, coming out of her mother’s bedroomwith paper in hand for a letter to Bethany. He put his arms around her waist and hugged hertightly. Anne stopped in surprise.“Father will beat me again, and I’m scared for Mother! Do not let him hurt mother or me,please, Anne? Can I see mother?”Anne was William’s elder sister by eleven years and loved him with all her heart. She was aloving, gentle girl, but there was underlying steel in her armour and an intelligent mind thatwould help her stand up to her father. She loved playing pirates and ‘hide and seek’ withWilliam and marvelled at his imagination. Wiping away the tears running down his face andfolding her arms around the shuddering child, she knelt, kissed his cheek, and gave him abig hug.“No one will hurt you, William. Doctor Stephens told us mother would be better soon, but wemust not disturb her as the doctor is giving her a sleeping potion. Now come with me. Wewill draw a pirate.”The housekeeper was passing with various linens in her hands. “Ah - Mrs Jennings, I will bewith William upstairs in the boys’ bedroom.”Mrs Jennings turned, “I thought you and Clementine were with Mrs Turner, Miss Anne?”“No. Doctor Stephens is with her now. Clementine is in the kitchen with Madeline andMarcia.”Anne pulled some chalk and a slate from a drawer in the boys’ bedroom.“How about you draw me a picture of a pirate, William?”William toyed with the chalk as he was not presently interested in drawing. His mind wasbursting with the images of what transpired last night and what the consequence would befor him. Anne, drafting a letter to her sister Eleanora, noticed William watching her.“What is it, William?”He looked down and moved backwards and forwards on his feet, considering his words.Then, raising his eyes, he said, “Anne, if I told you something that was a secret, would youkeep it a secret?”“Of course I would, William – I’m one of the pirate crew! So, it would remain a secret!”William gave a slight shudder. “I was cold last night, and I woke up wanting mother. So, I tip-toed down the stairs. When I opened the door so little, I saw something I should not haveseen!”Anne was unsure she would welcome William’s next words.“Are you sure this was not a dream, William?”“No, I got out of bed and went down!”Anne leaned back on her chair and took a deep breath.“Anne, you promise you won’t tell anyone?”“I promise!”“Father was beating mother with his hand. I was so scared! He saw me at the door. I think hewill beat me, too.”William’s comments now confirmed Anne’s suspicions. She was aware of women’sdependent position in a marriage relationship and how she was helpless to assist. ButWilliam was frightened – and with good reason!“William, I think you may have been dreaming. I think it would be best if you forget thismatter. We will keep this as a pirate’s secret between you and me. If father asks, say youhad a bad dream. This way, you will be safe, and it will stay a secret.”William shivered and looked straight into Anne’s face. She reflected, ‘What a handsome boyyou are!’ William saw the reassurance in her smile and collapsed into her arms for a big hug.Jonathan Turner felt satisfied as he finished a good breakfast in the kitchen.Thomas, Jonathan’s eldest son, rushed in, “Father, Doctor Stephens has asked for you inthe drawing room. He asked for you alone!”Jonathan scowled at his son, then moved through the hallway and found old JeremyStephens sitting at a table, looking down into a cup of tea.“Jeremy?”“Jonathan.” Doctor Stephens knew this would be a difficult discussion and decided on themost diplomatic approach for Jonathan. They must agree on the medical care that Eleanorawould require. Unfortunately, this would not please Jonathan. He paused, wiping his mouth.“Jonathan, let us talk a bit longer than last time. I need your help if Eleanora is to regain herhealth. She will recover, but she is weak and must rest! Undisturbed rest!”“This she shall have, Doctor!” Jonathan stood aloof.“I have given Anne and Clementine instructions on what is needed. They are both good,smart girls and capable of nursing your wife. She will be recuperating for several weeks – Iwill call as often as possible.”Jeremy Stephens had served as the family Doctor for over forty years and delivered theeight Turner children. He was also a good friend of Jonathan’s, serving with him on thechurch parish council. Jeremy was usually a happy fellow, always smiling, but not today. Helooked up into Jonathan Turner’s questioning eyes.“Jonathan, I know you strongly need comfort from your wife. I also understand that you havebeen a faithful husband. Johnathan, it is time you understood that you might not expectrepayment in kind!”Jonathan’s face tightened, and the colour in his temple slightly glowed. He stared directlyinto Jeremy’s eyes, concerned about what might be said next.“Jonathan, Eleanora has provided you with eight children. Praise God that they are healthyand beautiful. But, childbirth has a major effect on a woman’s health. With the number ofbirths, there must be some consideration of the effects this has on Eleanora’s body. It wouldhelp if you thought of this in the future. It is in your interest that your relations with her aregentle.”“Jeremy, what are you telling me – that I cannot have union with my wife? That she cannotfulfil her role in our marriage?”“No, I’m not saying that – what I’m saying is that you must master your enthusiasm for thatunion. Surely, you understand that as people grow older, they slow down and need morecare. Take care and be gentle with her. That is not hard for a fellow like you, who dearlyloves his wife.”“I expect my wife to serve me as promised on our wedding day. However, at your request, Iwill curb my demands.”“Thank you, Jonathan – you will both benefit from this. And it must be at least three monthsbefore you share her bed again. Even then, I will insist on examining her before one of theseunions occurs.”“What!”Jonathan stepped back. He was a man who expected his nightly comfort. This enforcedabstinence would be most inconvenient. The anger welled up inside him.Jeremy, expecting this reaction, led quickly to his next point.“Now, there is just one other matter!”“I thought you had said enough, Jeremy!”“On examining Eleanora, I found bruises on her face, arms, and back as if someone beather. These were not injuries that would have come from a union of loving partners, Jonathan.I’m not sure how these injuries were incurred or when, but I would ask that you protect yourwife in future and ensure this does not happen again.”Jonathan Turner looked away from the Doctor. His mind flew into a panic. In his enthusiasmfor union last night, he had beaten her into submission. He felt some guilt but reassuredhimself that this was his wife’s duty – otherwise, the population would decrease. Then heshuddered at the memory of the door creaking open and William peeking through, lookingfor his mother. The boy dashed away quickly on being discovered. However, Jonathan wasnot sure how much he had seen.“I am not sure how she came by those bruises, but whoever caused them shall receive abeating if I catch them. I will talk with her once she recovers and ask how this happened.”Jeremy looked long and hard at Jonathan in silence, then sipped his cup of tea.“Jonathan, you hold an honoured place in our community as Chairman of the Parish Council.As a council member, I can assure you of my total support. I would advise that it might beprudent if your wife is confined until the bruises are well gone. Who knows what gossip maystart if Eleanora appears in her present state?”“Ah……I agree, Doctor. I understand. Thank you for the advice and your understanding. It ismuch appreciated.”Doctor Jeremy Stephens refrained from judgment but surmised what happened. He took afinal sip of his cup of tea and took his leave. “I will show myself out, Jonathan.”Jonathan stood there silently, his anger rising as he knew he must not touch his wife againfor some time. His knuckles grew white as the grasp of both hands gripped the mantelpiece.He steadied himself. But he must have comfort. How?Before leaving, Jeremy made a final comment. “Ah, Jonathan …. Eleanora is with child!”Jonathan turned in disbelief, “She never said this last night.”“It may be between two and three months. She will need extra care during her confinement.You were fortunate she did not lose the child this morning – yet this may still occur. Goodmorning, Jonathan.”As Doctor Stephens left, Anne quickly moved beside him and whispered, “Doctor, would youhave time for William, as he has blood on him and is shaking awfully.”“Where is the boy, Anne?”“In the kitchen with Simeon.”Doctor Stephens quickly moved into the kitchen, where Mrs Jennings talked with thechimney sweeps in harsh tones. He saw the boy cowering on a chair. Noticing a shirt sleevecovered in blood, Doctor Stephens quickly examined him and found no physical injuries.However, he was obviously either in shock or in a state of fear. Either way, he neededsettling down. Mrs Jennings, turning from her conversation, looked at William and the doctor,eyeing the bloodied sleeve. “Why, Doctor Stephens, I thought you were gone; the sheetsmust have rubbed against his sleeve as I carried him downstairs.” The doctor nodded.“Anne, please get a blanket and wrap him up. Make sure he stays warm for the next fewhours. No chores, no school; I will advise Reverend Taggart as I pass. Keep him warm andquiet. I will call again this afternoon and check on Mrs Turner and William.”“Thank you, Doctor.”Jeremy Stephens took his leave, walked down the hallway, and exited by the front door. Hebelieved Jonathan Turner to be a sensible man who was well-mannered and successful inbusiness. He found it difficult to accept that Jonathan, a fellow member of the church parishcouncil, would beat his wife. But it was common with those who had money. The moremoney, the more beatings it seemed. Stephens frowned – there was no other explanation –the bruising was fresh. He knew Jonathan’s wife would recover with a month’s rest but betterthree months. She surely deserved a rest after providing eight children and another on theway.There were no money troubles – Jonathan could afford extra help around the house.Eleanora would recover, although, after last night, she might still lose the baby. Perhaps inher state, that may be the best thing. He was more concerned about William. What wouldhave put the child into shock? There were no physical injuries – there must be some othercause! Jeremy Stephens thought hard as he walked away down High Street. ‘Perhaps therewas a witness!’Standing alone in the drawing room, with his hands on the sideboard near the window,Jonathan gazed out, seeing nothing as he considered the implications of his conversationwith Jeremy. His mind raced – the prospect of being without the comfort of a wife for the nextthree months was not acceptable. How would he cope with that? He pulled out hishandkerchief and wiped his brow. Another child – God was blessing them with another child.How wonderful! Please let it be another boy. He must ensure Eleanora was cared for overthe next few months.Clementine was already helping around the house, and she could do more. He would stopher from finishing school lessons for three months and set her to work with Mrs. Jennings.Perhaps Anne should not attend the bakery and stay home – no, she was too important nowin managing the finances and the office staff. Johnathon decided he would increaseClementine’s load – it would benefit her. This change may even save some money on herfinishing school fees.What troubled him was his desire for his wife. He was a man who needed a union often. Hewas a faithful husband and never touched another woman. He sighed. Perhaps now he mustthink like other men did - find an alternative. He needed advice on this.Jonathan was due at a Bakers Guild meeting in London next Tuesday. It was Thursday now.He would consult his brother Richard, who ran a small tavern in Ewell – The Black Swan. Bybreaking his journey there, he would discuss the issues with his brother. Jonathan andRichard were close and shared similar outlooks on business. Richard was a risk-taker andleft home early, not keen on becoming a baker.He now rented a building in Ewell, where he ran a prosperous tavern. The rental agreementwith the local Manor Lord required a sharing of profits, which Richard considered unfair asthe pub’s profits were growing nicely.For the last few years, he had mounted a search for new business opportunities. A letter hadcome requesting a visit from Jonathan when convenient, and Richard would seek Jonathan’sopinion on a new venture. The London trip would be a good opportunity for Jonathan to visitRichard and share his predicament.Jonathan was satisfied with this strategy. His planning was always well thought out, ensuringthorough consideration of new ventures. The one failing was his rage, which quicklyheightened if anything went wrong. Sometimes, deciding in haste would prove costly for him.At present, he must keep the family’s situation stable but, more importantly, private! Nowwas the time to talk with his wife gently and then William. If William saw too much, then hemust silence the boy somehow. That would be a challenge with a six-year-old.He turned from the window, moved slowly up the stairs, and stopped at his wife’s bedroom.Having considered what he should say, he entered and found Clementine sitting at hermother’s side, stroking her hand and quietly talking with her.“Where is Anne?” Jonathan asked – he wanted privacy in the next few minutes.“She is at the bakery catching up on her work – caring for mother this morning took sometime, and when she heard you and the doctor were here, she rushed off.”“Ah, she is a fine young lady—the same as you, Clementine, sitting here taking care of yourmother. I am so thankful for you both. I will call you back when we finish talking. You mightcheck with Mrs Jennings on the household duties and where William is?”Clementine, at fourteen, was finished at the church school and undertaking finishing lessonsthree days a week. Outside of these lessons, she assisted her mother with running thehouse. With her energy, health, and adventurous spirit, Jonathan saw potential inClementine. She was well educated - could read and write and was gifted with some skill inmathematics but not as sound as Anne. He felt she could run a business for him in thecoming years. The only problem was her loud booming voice, fit for a sergeant major ratherthan a sweet young girl. He was surprised at the softness in her voice today and foundanother quality in her: empathy.“Certainly, Father. I shall wait for you to call.”Eleanora Turner gave a slight tremble and turned her head away from Jonathan. She restedin a large double bed with soft pillows and a light bedspread. The sheets were white andcrisp. She was a beautiful woman at forty-two, even after delivering eight children. Her whitecomplexion was flawless, and her long golden hair draped over her shoulders and coveredher full breasts in a beautiful blue nightgown. She wore a slight rouge on her cheeks, justenough to make her look radiant.Jonathan loved this woman with all his heart and wanted her immediately, yet he knew hemust hold back – give her time to recover. He marvelled at how she became more beautifulas she matured in age.He gently picked up her hand.“How are you, my darling, Eleanora?”Eleanora shook again and then slowly turned and looked at him. He could see the bruiseson her cheeks and arms. Her eyes were tired and red, and from a closer look, he saw thatunder the rouge, she was pale, probably from loss of blood, and displayed signs of littleenergy.“Jon, you beat me last night. You promised never to do that again, yet last night you did.Why? I asked you to stop, I pleaded with you, yet it was as if you were enjoying it. Then youforced yourself on me so violently and hurt me!” She began sobbing.“Jon, please, I am your wife, your helpmeet. I have always honoured and served you well,but you must not treat me so.”Jonathan Turner sat in silence and knew what she said was true. He would not deny that heenjoyed the violent union. His lust drove the complete loss of control last night, and evennow, Jonathan wanted more but knew he needed forgiveness for his acts. It frightened himthat he unknowingly harmed his loving wife. What was at work within him that caused this?He could not speak. He just sat there in shame, looking into her moist eyes.“The Doctor told me to remain in bed for some time. He will visit regularly and check on myrecovery. He left potions with Anne and Clementine, who will care for me. But I must haverest, Jonathan; you must let me rest. Come the time, we will have union again, but neveragain like that, please, or you may not have me anymore.”The words slowly came from his trembling mouth.“Please forgive me, Eleanora. I know I have acted wrongly, and I will plead my case with theAlmighty in Church on Sunday. I will let you rest for as long as you need and consult thedoctor regularly on your progress. Let me know of anything that you need.”He sat there, clutching for the right words.“I love you so much, my Dear! I am ashamed of what happened last night. I lost control.Please forgive me!”Eleanora smiled slightly in relief and placed her hand on his.He leant over to kiss her, but she turned her head away.“Why did you not tell me you were with child? I am so pleased for us. Another one for thefamily.”She turned slowly and looked at him again. “I was not sure, Jonathan - it is early, and I wasnot sure. But it might be lost – you must not abuse me anymore, or you will harm the child.Please let me rest now. And Jon, it will be best if you sleep in the guest room for the next fewmonths.”“Yes, Dear. I will leave you now as much is happening in the house and the bakery. I will visitwith you after dinner.”Jonathan left quietly, finding Clementine outside, waiting for him. She asked calmly, “Father,I am afraid for Mother. She suffers greatly, and did you see the bruising on her arms andcheeks? It is as if she was in a fight……….!” She went silent as he stared at her.“The Doctor advised me on all this, and we shall hear no more of it. Thank you for lookingafter your mother, and please stay with her while she requires it. She must have a long rest,and we will take a holiday when she recovers. There are bakeries and cake shops inLondon. I wish for your and Anne’s opinion on them. Now, where is William?”“He is in his room, Father – drawing pirates. Doctor Stephens said he must remain at hometoday and rest.”Jonathan nodded and climbed the stairs to the second-floor bedrooms. Wrapped tightly in ablanket, William sat on the floor, drawing on a slate. The young boy appeared relativelypeaceful in his task.For a few minutes, Johnathan considered his relationship with his son. William was hot andcold. The boy was full of energy and vigour and could do almost any physical activity at hisyoung age, but he was also full of mischief, and there was a stubborn streak in him thatclashed violently with Jonathan.What did he see? What had he heard? He must find out.“William, the Doctor, advised that you need rest – you may stay home today and not attendschool. However, I do not want you involved in mischief. Why are you unwell – did you notsleep well last night?”At six years old, William had a sharp mind and could see his chance at an excuse.“Nightmares, Father! Anne told me I was too hot in bed, and they were bad dreams that Iwould forget.”Jonathan Turner considered this response. He was not sure if the child thought he wassleepwalking. If so, he would encourage this belief of nightmares so it was no longer anissue.“Yes, William, I would say it was nightmares, and you will be over it soon.”Jonathan Turner knew he was safe. Thank goodness for Anne.Mrs Jennings gently tapped him on the shoulder and beckoned him. Jonathan followed butturned and took one last look at his son. William also looked up and gazed straight into hisfather’s eyes - displaying a knowing well beyond his years. Jonathan Turner knew, at thatmoment, William saw everything.He turned and went without saying a word.“The chimney sweep, Mr Jack Slope, is demanding a meeting with you, Mr Turner, about thepay for his work. He says he won’t send his boys up the chimneys until you see him andsettle it.” Mrs Jennings would usually manage these things without him, but Slope wasangling for more money today, and Mrs Jennings was a bit rattled by the morning events.Jonathan mused - Slope knew the rates were the same as at his business. Damn, the man,for the trouble he was causing!“Come, Mrs Jennings – let us see Jack Slope and solve his problem.”William peered around the corner, making sure the coast was clear. His father wasdownstairs, meaning William was free for a while. He loved watching the chimney sweeps dotheir job. Some of the boys were younger than him but could crawl up amazingly thinchimneys and clean them quickly. Watching Mrs Jennings curse about all the soot comingdown and out over the floors was also fun.A loud conversation occurred in the kitchen, where his father gave the chimney sweep, JackSlope, a good roasting. Quietly, William crept along the hallway, stopping at the stairwellwindow to see his father walking down the path. Hopefully, it would be soon before thechimney sweeps started work.

Turners Rage: Copyright notes
Turners Rage: Copyright notes

03 March 2024, 1:56 AM

Copyright © 2020 James SeymourISBN: 978-922565-80-8Published by Vivid PublishingA division of Fontaine Publishing GroupPO Box 948, FremantleWestern Australia 6959www.vividpublishing.com.auA catalogue record for this book is available from the National Library of Australia.DISCLAIMER:In this publication, all characters – other than the obvious historical figures – are fictitious, and anyresemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.This novel is set primarily in the Guildford area of the UK, spanning some cities and outlyingsettlements of Scotland, some towns and suburbs of Ireland, Kingston, Jamacia and some referencesto South Africa. The combination of historical information and fictitious detail has been attempted,and the author has provided explanatory footnotes where possible. Some place names and sites arefictitious, and any resemblance of these fictitious names and locations to actual places is purelycoincidental.All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording orotherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright holder.Copyright ©2022 James SeymourThe Manuscript for the Bugle – 27/02/2024In this Manuscript some minor adjustments have been made to punctuation and grammar. Thesechanges are minor and relate to a review of the document before submission to the Bugle. The Storyis unchanged from the Vivid Publishing novel.The Manuscript for the Bugle – 27/02/2024 In this Manuscript, some minor adjustments have been made to punctuation and grammar. These minor changes relate to a review of the document before submission to the Bugle. The Story is unchanged from the Vivid Publishing novel. Books by James Seymour Title Published PublisherTurner’s Rage - First Published 2020 - VividThird Edition - Published 2022 - VividTurner’s Awakening - Published 2021 - VividKeep an eye out for the release date for book three of the Turner series. The publisher is Vivid Publishing, a division of Fontaine Press - www.vividpublishing.com.au

Turner's Rage: List of Characters
Turner's Rage: List of Characters

01 February 2024, 2:21 AM

Turner’s RageList of CharactersJuly 1826The Turner Family of GuildfordJonathan Turner          Father of William            Baker and Business OwnerEleanora Turner          Mother of William               Wife of Jonathan TurnerThomas Turner         Son of Jonathan & Eleanora              BakerBethany Charlotte Eleanora    Daughter of Jonathan & Eleanora          GovernessTurner (Beth)Anne Turner  Daughter of Jonathan & Eleanora     Business Assistant & Home helpClementine Turner (Clemmie) Daughter of Jonathan & Eleanora    Home helpMadeline Turner (Maddie)     Daughter of Jonathan & Eleanora      ChildSimeon Turner (Sim)      Son of Jonathan & Eleanora       ChildWilliam Turner (Will)     Son of Jonathan & Eleanora        ChildMarcia Turner          Daughter of Jonathan & Eleanora     ChildService StaffMrs Jennings      HousekeeperMiss Aggie Peters        MaidMrs Ethel Nibley      Mrs Turner’s MaidMiss Rosalind Nibley      Ethel’s daughterHuntley House, GreenwichMr Charles Boot       ButlerMiss Mary Troath        Lady’s MaidMrs Eliza Smythe        CookTurner Family Dogs          Snups       NoseyFamily Doctors               Dr Jeremy Stephens Dr Neville BassingtonDr David SopwithThe local Church, GuildfordRev Andrew Taggart       RectorMrs Laura Taggart       The Rector’s wife and church workerMrs Glossip     Church workerMr Jonathan Turner    Chairman, Parish CouncilMr Rupert Smith       Parish CouncilMr Blake Wood           Parish Council & Council Secretary & SolicitorDr Jeremy Stephens         Parish Council & SecretaryMr James Stewart       Parish Council, SolicitorMiss Ruby Bowers       Student – Church SchoolMiss Dawn Luckett        Student – Church SchoolThe Church at WokingRev Charles Upton      RectorMrs Wendy Upton       Spouse of Charles UptonMiss Bethany Turner       GovernessThe Turner BakeryMr Jeb Hiscock              Bakery ManagerMr Peter Hammer              Senior ForemanMr Aaron Hall        BakerMiss Rose Bell             BakerMiss Sophia Stanton      Pastry BakerMiss Heather Gant          Bakers AssistantMr Ralph Fenn         Bakery Cart Driver        Miss Audrey Stern     Accounts ClerkMr Robert Baxter       Stable ManagerJudd Hedge       Stable ManThe Epsom StablesMr Thomas Baxter     Stable ManagerHurst’s Tailors and SeamstressesMrs Fiona Smith       Seamstress and Guildford Shop ManagerMr Lionel Wall        Tailor and Manager Woking, and of the Store chainMiss Fiona Handle     Seamstress, Guildford ShopMr Tom Mead           Tailor, Guildford ShopThe Steam-Powered Flour MillMr Stanley Percival       Engineer, Watson’s Steam EngineersMr Terence Spencer      Mill ManagerMrs Lydia Spencer       Wife of TerenceMaster Levi Spencer       Son of Terence and LydiaMiss Andrea Spencer        Daughter of Terence and LydiaChimney SweepsMr Jack Slope         Master Chimney SweepReuben           Chimney SweepTom            Chimney SweepOlivia Stepton         Chimney Sweep            Batton Place ManorMr Patrick Easton         Lord of the ManorMr Mark Stepton             LabourerMrs Alison Stepton     Spouse of Mark Stepton and MaidThe Guilford CommunityMr Rupert Smith       Mayor & Parish Council MemberMrs Marjorie Smith      Wife of RupertMaster Richard Smith  Son of Rupert & Marjorie           Mr Russel Elliot        BlacksmithMaster Caleb Elliot       Son of Russel                                                                                                  Mr Isiah Linton        BlacksmithMr Frederick Higgins   Storekeeper     Mr Daniel Tuesbury      Master of Abbots HospitalGuildford ConstabularyMr Michael Rawlins       Parish ConstableMr Daniel Cricks     WatchmanThe Guildford InstituteMr Henry Sharples     Institute Volunteer OfficerThe Bassington Family of LondonMr David Bassington     Newspaper Owner and BooksellerMrs Jennifer Bassington       Wife of DavidDoctor Neville Winston                              Bassington, RN       Son of David & JenniferMiss Megan Bassington    Daughter of David & JenniferThe Bassington Family of GuildfordDoctor Neville Bassington        Son of David BassingtonMrs Bethany Bassington            nee TurnerThe McPherson Family of GreenwichMr Hamish McPherson      Brewer and BusinessmanMrs Marjorie McPherson    Spouse of HamishMr Douglass McPherson       Son of Hamish      Brewery Manager GlasgowMr Archie McPherson      Son of Hamish       Brewery Manager EdinburghMr Lachlan McPherson    Son of Hamish       Brewery Manager EdinburghMr James McPherson        Son of Hamish       Brewery Manager & Businessman              GlasgowJenkins     ButlerBabcock    Coach DriverHandle      FootmanMrs Swiggins        CookMiss Jones       NannyFamily Dogs         Red Socks                                                    BoilerThe Steele Family of Woolwich Mr Alexander Steele     Engineer & Founder of Woods Artillery FoundryMrs Jennifer Steele    Wife of AlexanderMr Mark Steele      Son of Alexander & JenniferMr Andrew Steele       Son of Alexander & JenniferMr Timothy Steele       Son of Alexander & JenniferMiss Marion Steele   Daughter of Alexander & JenniferMiss Nicole Stephens      Bridesmaid of MarionThe local Church at GreenwichArchdeacon Rufus Handle       Rector and Rural DeanMrs Felicity Handle        Wife of Archdeacon HandleThe Turner Family of EwellRichard Turner  Brother of Jonathan      Pub Owner ‘The Black Swan’Sarah Turner,       Wife of RichardOliver Turner,      Son of Richard & Sarah    Pub Manager, Epson   Harry Turner  Son of Richard & Sarah   Pub Manager, EwellKatherine Turner  Daughter of Richard & Sarah   ChildThe Racing Horse Pub, EpsonOliver Turner      Manager, Racing Horse Pub EpsomThe South Family of Fintelton ManorThe Right Honourable Sir David South                                     Earl of Fintelton and Lord of the ManorThe Right HonourableLady Jane South                             Countess of Fintelton, and wife of Sir DavidSir Hugh South   Son and Entitled Heir of Sir DavidSir Robert South RN    Son of Sir DavidLady Emma South  Daughter of Sir DavidMr Malcolm Stem   Estate ManagerMr Thomas Pike     ButlerMrs Cora Walsh    HousekeeperMr Henry Barrett      Earls ValetMrs Judy Wapples    CookMiss Margaret Lane    Lady Jane’s maidMiss Jane Winston    Lady Emma’s maidMiss Sally Johnson   MaidIn-Laws of the South’sSir John Philps      Brother of Lady Jane South       Lady Angela Philps   Sir John’s wife                                 The South Family AttorneysManifold & Stout       Sir David’s Attorneys.Mr Michael Manifold     Senior Partner, Manifold & Stout           DeceasedMr Evan Finchley         Senior Partner, Manifold & Stout“Harting” House, St James’s SquareMr Matthew Staines     ButlerMr Dennis Hopton      Previous ButlerMrs Cora Walsh         HousekeeperMr Henry Barrett         Earls ValetMrs Judy Wapples      CookMiss Margaret Lane       Lady Jane’s maidMiss Jane Winston         Lady Emma’s maidTenant Farmers of FinteltonMr Michael Merton   Tenant FarmerMrs Jenny Merton     Wife of MichaelThe Crew of HMS Providence Captain Mark Foster    CaptainLieutenant Neville Bassington SurgeonLieutenant Robert South   Officer of the Watch    The Crew of HMS RestlessCommander Sir Robert South          CaptainSergeant Michael Swanton        Captain’s First ServantAB Jonathon Bright           Captain’s Second Servant.Lieutenant Richard Small          First Officer (Mate)                       Lieutenant Frederick Ham        First Officer (Mate)Lieutenant Richard Brinkley         Second OfficerWarrant Officer Kevin Trotters        Master (Sailing Master)Petty Officer Richard Door          Master at Arms                               Petty Officer John Fulcher       Master at ArmsMr William Collins         MidshipmanMr Albert Kent              MidshipmanPetty Officer Richard Young       Quartermaster (Helmsman)    Captain Horace Coombes         Marine CommanderLieutenant Stanley White         2IC to Captain CoombesSergeant Philip Wait         Marines SergeantPetty Officer Ian Dodds       Ships CarpenterAdmiraltyAdmiral Sir Franklin Crouch      First Naval LordLady Katherine Crouch      Wife of Admiral CrouchThe Right Honourable Sir Cecil Fowey       Earl of Dawlting, and Advisor to the Board of NavyThe Right Honourable Lady Hannah Fowey    Countess of Dawlting, and wife of Sir CecilCountess of DawltingMr Malcolm Smith         ComptrollerMrs Robyn Smith        Wife of Malcolm SmithColonel Jonathan Scott       Admiralty Security Chief of StaffFlagship, Commander in Chief, Blue Fleet, PortsmouthAdmiral Sir Tristan Sutherland       Commander in Chief, Portsmouth Blue FleetLady Amanda Sutherland         Wife of Sir TristanCommodore Richard Jacobs        Secretary to Admiral SutherlandLieutenant Reginald Ludlam      SurgeonThe Guildford Medical PracticeDr Neville Bassington           Founding PartnerDr David Sopwith          Founding PartnerThe Sopwith FamilyDr David Sopwith     Local Doctor    Estates at Cookstown and Coleraine in IrelandMiss Victoria Sopwith        David’s SisterMrs Molly Lane        HousekeeperLions Bank of GuildfordMr Thomas Meyhew        Founder and OwnerMr Lawrence Appleby     High Street Branch ManagerMr John Short      Teller Lions Bank of PetersfieldMiss Katherine Constance      Bank TellerUnited Kingdom Investments rs Janet Stubbington       Wife of Frank Stubbington – Deceased

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